Hoover Daily Report
Analysis and Commentary
Analysis and Commentary

A Crisis May Be Worst Time to Deviate from Rules

by John B. Taylorvia Economics One
Thursday, August 29, 2013

In the Money interview with me which Melissa Francis posted yesterday she delved into two of my First Principles—the importance of the rule of law and rules-based policy—pointing out that many peop...

Analysis and Commentary

History Suggests Intervention In Syria Will Be Bad For Business

by Mark Harrisonvia Mark Harrison's Blog
Thursday, August 29, 2013




























Analysis and Commentary

Mark Levin Makes A Strong Conservative Case With Weak Constitutional Arguments

by David Davenportvia Forbes.com
Thursday, August 29, 2013

A lack of rules is not what keeps Obama and Progressives from behaving.

Analysis and Commentary

What Is the Syrian Plan

by Victor Davis Hansonvia Corner (National Review Online)
Wednesday, August 28, 2013

We are on the verge of a war with Syria. Yet I don’t think the administration has as of yet articulated what its aims are and thus is confused about the means of obtaining them. Is the point of the impending military action to remove Assad, engage his opposition, and foster a consensual society in his place, as if the U.S. can at last do what so far the Arab Spring has not? To destroy enough of his assets to allow the insurgents (but who exactly are they?) to rebound somewhat? To establish a new American-enforced global statute that WMD use is not permissible in a way that a Rwanda, Grozny, or the Sudan apparently was? To restore U.S. credibility to ensure that our red lines and deadlines are treated seriously? Simply to punish Assad to show our displeasure for his defiant role in 100,000 deaths? All, some, or none of these aims? Without clarity from the administration about our intentions, not only will we not have popular support or congressional assent (and, of course, after Libya, formal U.N. approval is not going to be forthcoming for our president and Nobel Peace Prize Laureate), but the administration itself will be confused over what it wants Syria to look like when it is done. At some point soon, let us hope that Obama addresses the nation, outlines U.S. aims and objectives, describes the coalition at our side, and brings the Congress on board. Otherwise, the world is getting the impression that American cruise missiles and bombs will fall for a few days largely to show Assad that we mean some sort of business and that our (inopportune) bluster about red lines was really serious, at least in a pre-9/11 sort of way. And it will suspect too that rather quickly we will suddenly stop the intervention, declare that it was a success, and in Libya-fashion forget that we ever did anything at all – in hopes that the Russians, Chinese, Islamists, and Iranians take us more seriously rather than believe Obama is still as naïve as he was in his open-mic promise to Russian president Dmitri Medvedev (“This is my last election. After my election I have more flexibility”). On about three or so reset occasions in the 20th century, the United States lost all sense of deterrence (e.g., 1939–41 [in response to WWI]; 1961–2 [in response to a long Cold War], 1979–80 [in response to Vietnam), because of either isolationism, misreading of prior American action, or misguided ideas about the nature of war and how to prevent it. And in each case, the restoration of deterrence was costly – and terrifying. We are now entering a similarly dangerous period, adrift and confused about both the past and present.

Analysis and Commentary

It's Hard to Stop Market Forces

by Russell Robertsvia Cafe Hayek
Wednesday, August 28, 2013

If you’re a sports fan, you’ll know that Johnny Manziel (last year’s Heisman Trophy winner) has been under investigation for selling autographs. He has evidently been cleared of that offense but has received a .5 game suspension for a milder

Analysis and Commentary

The Dream Today

by Kiron K. Skinnervia National Review Online
Wednesday, August 28, 2013

Fifty years after the March on Washington

Interviews
Interviews

Kori Schake on the John Batchelor Show (31:06)

with Kori Schakevia John Batchelor Show
Wednesday, August 28, 2013

Guests: Gordon Chang, Forbes.com; Neha Thirani Bagri, NYT; Aaron Klein, WABC; Amos Guiora, University of Utah; Kori Schake, Hoover.

Interviews

Victor Davis Hanson on Garrison Radio

with Victor Davis Hansonvia Garrison (WIBC)
Wednesday, August 28, 2013
In the News
In the News

Press Club Panel Looks at State of Economy

with John B. Taylorvia Money News
Thursday, August 29, 2013

On Aug. 21, the National Press Club hosted a panel of three experts to discuss the state of the U.S. economy, moderated by Jennifer Schonberger of The Wall Street Report.

In the News

‘Leaky’ Prez Giving Away Battle Plan: Critics

with Kori Schakevia New York Post
Thursday, August 29, 2013

Foreign-policy and national-security experts say the deluge of Obama-administration leaks about the impending Syrian strike is tipping the United States’ hand before the first missile is fired. Sources identified as…

In the News

The Costs of Symbolism in Syria

with Kori Schakevia townhall.com
Thursday, August 29, 2013

How many innocent Syrians should we be willing to kill to send a message? .03/27/2014 11:14:37AM EST.

In the News

Stanford Scholars Examine Outcome of Military Strike Against Syria

with Thomas H. Henriksen, Amy Zegartvia Stanford News
Thursday, August 29, 2013

Experts on intelligence, terrorism, human rights and Mideast policy discuss implications of military action against Syria.

In the News

Why Syria's Chemical Weapons Stockpile is Safe From Airstrikes

with Thomas H. Henriksenvia Los Angeles Times
Thursday, August 29, 2013

Syrian President Bashar Assad wields command over the world's biggest stockpile of chemical weapons, international security experts say, and he is expected to emerge from any punitive Western airstrikes with his arsenal intact.

In the News

Foreign Policy Experts Urge President Obama to Respond to Assad's Chemical Attack

with Fouad Ajami, Max Boot, Larry Diamond, Reuel Marc Gerecht, Tod Lindberg, Thomas Donnellyvia Foreign Policy Initiative
Wednesday, August 28, 2013

The United States remains the world's indispensable nation -- indispensable to international peace, security, and stability, and indispensable to safe-guarding and advancing the ideals and principles we hold dear.