Hoover Daily Report
Analysis and Commentary
Analysis and Commentary

Why Doesn’t President Obama Seek Congressional Approval for Syria?

by Jack Goldsmithvia Lawfare
Wednesday, August 28, 2013

I have a pretty broad view of presidential power to use military force abroad without congressional authorization.  On that view, which is close to the past views of the Office of Legal Counsel, the planned use of military force in Syria is a constitutiona

Analysis and Commentary

When It Comes To Obamacare, Ignorance Is Bliss For Young Americans

by Scott W. Atlasvia Forbes.com
Wednesday, August 28, 2013

ObamaCare mandates are blatantly contrary to the best economic interests of younger Americans.

Analysis and Commentary

Our Contrary President

by Bruce Thorntonvia FrontPage Mag.com
Wednesday, August 28, 2013

Violating every maxim of proven wisdom for dealing with the rest of the world.

Analysis and Commentary

'Regulatory Overkill' Lets Bureaucrats (Literally) Get Away With Murder

by Henry I. Millervia Forbes.com
Wednesday, August 28, 2013

The costs of complying with government oversight have profound real-world impacts on real people.

Analysis and Commentary

What Parents Want—and How Policymakers Can Provide It

by Chester E. Finn Jr., Michael J. Petrillivia Education Next
Tuesday, August 27, 2013
Analysis and Commentary

Syrian Surrealities

by Victor Davis Hansonvia Corner (National Review Online)
Tuesday, August 27, 2013

Once again we are trying to rally the American people about the dangers of purported WMD use; this time around, the Syrians may be doing to their own what Saddam Hussein most certainly did to the Kurds.  John Kerry gave an impassioned speech that the civilized world cannot let this atrocity stand, on the theory that the circumstances that led to 99 percent of the Syrians deaths so far did not warrant action, but that the last one percent have died in a fashion that is intolerable. I don’t know quite what the Kerry-Obama lexicon of “undeniable,” “inexcusable,” or “unacceptable” means anymore, whether in a context of toxic gas or thousands of centrifuges. But unfortunately, the civilized world, for all its moral platitudes, never claimed that the use of WMD would not stand – only the U.S. established that redline when Barack Obama repeatedly warned Bashar Assad that he should not only step down but that any use of WMD was a game changer. So the U.N. and the EU will look to Obama to bell the cat that he warned was a generic threat to all mice. Don’t expect any actions from the United Nations even when lobbied by a Nobel Peace Prize laureate, given that Russia would veto any multilateral action on the premise that not long ago it was snookered when the Libyan no-fly-zones and humanitarian aid quickly escalated into U.N.-nonapproved bombing and ground support. Anyway, Russia and China hope the U.S. either becomes bogged down after intervening or keeps blustering to intervene and then is rendered weak-looking when it does not.  I think one leading-from-behind escapade was enough for the traumatized Europeans. Don’t expect another Arab League resolution that the Obama administration values more than an authorization from the U.S. Congress.  Only a tiny minority of Americans wishes to intervene – given what they saw at Benghazi, the third cycle of revolution in Egypt, and the blood and treasure lost in Iraq. The president has certainly not spent the last 6 months building public opinion and political coalitions for any sort of action. He seems as bored by Syria as he was on the night of the bin Laden raid when he stepped out to play cards with Reggie Love or during the Benghazi  debacle when he retired early given the next day’s Las Vegas urgencies. Why doesn’t it all just go away? The old idea of a U.S. backed, new moderate Muslim axis of Erdogan, Morsi, and new ‘moderates’ in Iran deflating Islamic radicalism is a Carter caricature. We are not facing an election this year, so the fierce urgency of now is not so fierce or urgent. John Kerry is talking in a bellicose fashion that a candidate Barack Obama, circa 2007, would caution us about. No doubt in the next two weeks we are looking at launching a few cruise missiles to save face or an imposition of a no-fly-zone to hamper Assad. A nocturnal strike aimed at air assets and infrastructure and ceasing by dawn is also a likely scenario — out of possible scenarios judged not by efficacy of the actions taken so much as by the least number of nations offended and the quickest and safest way to end them. Russian ships might mass; the Iranians might threaten to do this and that; Hezbollah or Syria might lob some missiles at Israel (in hopes that the Arab world would hope that they had some WMD in them), but the U.S. could likely act in a small, symbolic way without igniting a regional war. Neither missiles nor bombs necessarily would guarantee that Assad would not use such weapons again. Only U.S. ground troops could do that – and that is politically out of the question, given that it would end up, strategically speaking, with using Americans to fight a secular genocidal dictator mostly to the benefit of radical Islamists with al-Qaeda sympathies.  And lastly there is the tragic irony. We are now in a surreal landscape in which the Left urges action on suspicion of WMD use, citing the humanitarian issues involved, the larger concerns of the civilized world, and U.S. strategic interests. U.N. weapon inspectors are not allowed in. There is good evidence that Assad is lying about his use of WMD or at least trying to mislead in some fashion not altogether discernible. Where are Joe Wilson, Hans Blix, and Mohamed ElBaradei when we need them? Where the Syrian WMD came from or where they are stored is still a mystery, given that we were assured long ago by opponents of the Iraq War that Saddam did not pose a threat and thus his WMD stockpiles, if they ever existed, did not go to Syria on the eve of that war. In a larger sense, who now exercises influence in the Middle East? No one really – although Iran, its Shiite terrorist appendages, Hezbollah, Bashar Assad, China, and Russia all certainly have more clout than the U.S., the U.N., and Europe combined. 

Analysis and Commentary

David Davenport: As Justice Scalia Predicted...

with David Davenportvia townhall.com
Tuesday, August 27, 2013

The Townhall.com Daily Commentary brings concise yet penetrating insight from some of the sharpest minds in the conservative world today: reporter and author David Aikman, Weekly Standard publisher, Terry Eastland, and Salem talk radio hosts Hugh Hewitt, Michael Medved, Albert Mohler. .03/27/2014 11:16:28AM EST.

Analysis and Commentary

The Supplement Industry's Hypocrisy

by Henry I. Millervia Roll Call (DC)
Tuesday, August 27, 2013

Illinois Democratic Sen. Dick Durbin s bill to require the makers of dietary supplements to label their products accurately has the industry up in arms. This is rank hypocrisy. The supplement industry, along with the organic food lobby, does support labeling -- but only when the products in question belong to competitors such as the producers of foods from genetically engineered plants, a situation in which the labels serve no useful purpose.

Interviews
Interviews

John Taylor on Closing Bell (3:08)

with John B. Taylorvia Closing Bell (CNBC)
Tuesday, August 27, 2013

CNBC's John Harwood reports Treasury Secretary Jack Lew said that President Obama will not be negotiating over the debt limit. Should investors be worried about another debt showdown in September? Maya MacGuineas, head of the campaign Fix the Debt, and John Taylor, former Treasury Undersecretary, weigh in.

Interviews

Paul Gregory on the John Batchelor Show (9:52)

with Paul R. Gregoryvia John Batchelor Show
Tuesday, August 27, 2013
Interviews

Bill Whalen on the John Batchelor Show (1:24)

with Bill Whalenvia John Batchelor Show
Tuesday, August 27, 2013
In the News
In the News

America Should 'Frown' Upon Jesse Jackson

with Shelby Steelevia Christian Post (DC)
Tuesday, August 27, 2013

As if to underscore Dr. Steele's points, we have the appalling understatement of Jesse Jackson in response to the random killing of a young Australian jogger in Oklahoma. Jackson tweeted: Such actions are "frowned upon."

In the News

Divestment of Fossil Fuel Holdings Up for Vote by Silicon Valley Water District

with Jeremy Carlvia Hoover Daily Report
Monday, August 26, 2013

Santa Clara Valley Water District is set to vote to drop fossil fuel holdings Tuesday. It would join San Francisco, Seattle and other cities as part of a burgeoning climate change protest against coal, oil and gas companies. Critics call it empty symbolism.