National Security, Technology & Law Working Group

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Analysis and Commentary

e-Residency In Estonia, Part III: Wherein I Use My New Digital Identity Card To Swap Letters With The President

by Benjamin Wittesvia Lawfare
Friday, March 4, 2016

The other day, I received a letter from Estonian President Toomas Hendrik Ilves. It came in the form of an unadorned Microsoft Word file called "wittes.docx." It did not bear President Ilves's John Hancock. Nor was it on the letterhead of the office of the Estonian Presidency.

Analysis and Commentary

Estonian Digital Residency Update IV: The President Weighs In On "Going Dark"

by Benjamin Wittesvia Lawfare
Tuesday, March 1, 2016

The FBI v. Apple flap exploded on the public scene just as I was learning my way around my new Estonian e-Residency card, which promises—among other things—secure communications between card holders. I am currently working on the next piece in my series about Estonian e-Residency, so more on the...

Trends and Predictions in Foreign Intelligence Surveillance: The FAA and Beyond

by David S. Krisvia Aegis Paper Series
Thursday, February 25, 2016

Beginning in 2013, Edward Snowden’s leaks caused the U.S. government to significantly reduce the scope, and increase the transparency, of its foreign intelligence surveillance, while the President urged caution and restraint in response to the extraordinary rise of the Islamic State of Iraq and the Levant (ISIL).

Analysis and Commentary

Apple Brief! Get Yer Apple Brief Here!

by Benjamin Wittesvia Lawfare
Thursday, February 25, 2016

You know you want one.

Analysis and Commentary

Trends And Predictions In Foreign Intelligence Surveillance: The FAA And Beyond

by David S. Krisvia Aegis
Thursday, February 25, 2016

It is a strange time for national security. Beginning in 2013, Edward Snowden’s leaks caused the U.S. government to significantly reduce the scope, and increase the transparency, of its foreign intelligence surveillance, while the President urged caution and restraint in response to the extraordinary rise of the Islamic State of Iraq and the Levant (ISIL).

Featured

Introducing Aegis: Security Policy In Depth

by Jack Goldsmith, Benjamin Wittesvia Lawfare
Thursday, February 25, 2016

We are delighted to announce the launch of Lawfare's new subsidiary page, called Aegis: Security Policy in Depth. Aegis is designed to focus on work of greater length and depth than we normally run on Lawfare, exploring legal and policy issues at the intersection of technology, national security, and law.

In the News

Invitation To The Hoover Book Soiree: Gen. Michael Hayden On "Playing To The Edge: American Intelligence In The Age Of Terror"

by Hoover Institutionvia Lawfare
Wednesday, February 24, 2016

The sixth in our series of book soirees at the Hoover Institution's Washington offices will take place on March 11, when Benjamin Wittes will interview Gen. Michael Hayden on his new book, Playing to the Edge: American Intelligence in the Age of Terror.

Analysis and Commentary

Notes On President Obama's Guantanamo Closure Plan

by Benjamin Wittesvia Lawfare
Tuesday, February 23, 2016

President Obama's Guantanamo closure report begins with a false statement and proceeds make a series of valid points. 

Analysis and Commentary

Brookings Event: "Who We Really Are: A Conversation With Syrian Refugees in America"

by Benjamin Wittesvia Lawfare
Saturday, February 20, 2016

I haven't yet watched this event, which took place yesterday at Brookings, but I hear it was extremely moving.

Supreme Court justice Antonin Scalia.
Analysis and Commentary

Miguel Estrada And My Thoughts On The Politics Of Replacing Justice Scalia

by Benjamin Wittesvia Lawfare
Friday, February 19, 2016

This has nothing to do with national security, but I have a feeling it will be of interest to many Lawfare readers anyway. Miguel Estrada and I have an essay out in the Washington Post on the judicial confirmation process and the politics of replacing Justice Scalia.

Pages

Aegis on Lawfare

 
Aegis explores legal and policy issues at the intersection of technology and national security.  Published in partnership with Lawfare, it features long-form essays of the working group, examines major new books in the field, and carries podcasts and videos or the working group’s events in Washington and Stanford.

Security by the Book Podcasts

The Security by the Book podcast series features monthly interviews with authors of important, new national security-oriented books and publications.

The Working Group on National Security, Technology, and Law brings together national and international specialists with broad interdisciplinary expertise to analyze how technology affects national security and national security law and how governments can use that technology to defend themselves, consistent with constitutional values and the rule of law.

The group will focus on a broad range of interests, from surveillance to counterterrorism to the dramatic impact that rapid technological change—digitalization, computerization, miniaturization, and automaticity—are having on national security and national security law. Topics include cybersecurity, the rise of drones and autonomous weapons systems, and the need for and dangers of state surveillance. The group’s output will also be published on the Lawfare blog, which covers the merits of the underlying legal and policy debates of actions taken or contemplated to protect the nation and the nation’s laws and legal institutions.

Jack Goldsmith and Benjamin Wittes are the cochairs of the National Security, Technology, and Law Working Group.