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Blank Section (Placeholder)EssaysAnalysis and Commentary

Due Diligence And The US Defend Forward Cyber Strategy

by Eric Talbot Jensen, Sean Wattsvia Aegis Paper Series
Thursday, October 15, 2020

This paper analyzes the international law principle of due diligence and its potential role in the United States’ emerging Defend Forward cyber strategy. The authors begin with a brief review of due diligence and recount recent efforts to apply due diligence in cyberspace. They then review past US experience with due diligence and conclude that renewed recognition of this principle might complement the Defend Forward strategy in cyberspace, if appropriately tailored.

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Covert Deception, Strategic Fraud, And The Rule Of Prohibited Intervention

by Gary P. Cornvia Aegis Paper Series
Friday, September 18, 2020

The Digital Revolution and the evolution of the information environment have ushered in an unprecedented era of information conflict, with revisionist states using hostile, disinformation-based influence campaigns to subvert democratic governance and the rule of law. International law has struggled to keep pace. This essay argues for an interpretation of international law that would consider strategic, covert deception as a form of prohibited coercion in violation of the rule of nonintervention.

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Persistent Aggrandizement? Israel’s Cyber Defense Architecture

by Elena Chachkovia Aegis Paper Series
Wednesday, August 26, 2020

This essay compares Israel’s cyber defense architecture and recent reform with key concepts in current US strategy: Defend Forward and Persistent Engagement. It finds that the Israeli equivalent to Defend Forward is far less regulated than its US parallel, and that the Israeli version of Persistent Engagement at home allows domestic action and harnesses the private sector in ways that the US approach does not contemplate.

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Defend Forward And Cyber Countermeasures

by Ashley Deeksvia Aegis Paper Series
Tuesday, August 4, 2020

Understanding when and how states may lawfully deploy countermeasures is critical for states operating in the cyber arena—not only to understand their own options when injured but also to anticipate the responses that their cyber activities may trigger from other states. This essay examines the role that countermeasures may play in the US cyber strategy of Defend Forward and argues that some states are developing a lex specialis of cyber countermeasures.

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The Domestic Legal Framework for US Military Cyber Operations

by Robert Chesneyvia Aegis Paper Series
Wednesday, July 29, 2020

With little fanfare, Congress and the executive branch have cooperated effectively over the past decade to build a legal architecture for military cyber operations. The resulting framework is not a familiar one to most observers, especially when compared to the parallel frameworks associated with conventional military operations and with intelligence activities. Yet it is no less important and worthy of study, particularly in light of the Pentagon’s commitment to the “defend forward” operational model.

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The Discourse Of Control And Consent Over Data In EU Data Protection Law And Beyond

by Elettra Biettivia Aegis Paper Series
Friday, January 10, 2020

Across the United States and Europe, the act of clicking “I have read and agree” to terms of service is the central legitimating device for global tech platforms’ data-driven activities. In the European Union, the General Data Protection Regulation has recently come into force, introducing stringent new criteria for consent and stronger protections for individuals. 

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The Discourse of Control and Consent over Data in EU Data Protection Law and Beyond

by Elettra Biettivia Aegis Paper Series
Wednesday, January 8, 2020

Across the United States and Europe, the act of clicking “I have read and agree” to terms of service is the central legitimating device for global tech platforms’ data-driven activities. In the European Union, the General Data Protection Regulation has recently come into force, introducing stringent new criteria for consent and stronger protections for individuals. Yet the entrenched long-term focus on users’ control and consent fails to protect consumers who face increasingly intrusive data collection practices.   

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Verified Accountability

by Evelyn Douekvia Aegis Paper Series
Tuesday, September 17, 2019

The way platforms currently conduct content moderation has been delegitimized, and new forms of governance will need to emerge to meet the demands of the moment. Semi-independent and transparent self-regulatory oversight mechanisms offer significant advantages. As the actors closest to the front line, platforms will always need to play a significant role in drawing lines for online speech, given the high-volume, fast-moving and context-dependent nature of the decisions involved.

US-China Relations

China’s Place In U.S. Foreign Policy

by Ambassador Karl W. Eikenberry
Tuesday, June 9, 2015

China is a peculiar combination of a domestic status quo power and a rising international power. An effective U.S. China policy is best built on a thorough assessment of the context in which Sino-American relations exist and operate.

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Toward A National Security Strategy

by Ambassador Karl W. Eikenberryvia Defining Ideas
Thursday, June 4, 2015

We need to consider what our institutions are capable of before declaring foreign policy goals. 

Pages

Latest Essay Series: Global Governance


Transnational terrorism, cyber-security, and Russian violation of accepted international norms in the Crimea have posed unique challenges for the United States. This set of essays suggest how these threats might best be understood and met.

Chair
Senior Fellow
Davies Family Senior Fellow
Participants
Tad and Dianne Taube Senior Fellow
Distinguished Visiting Fellow
Peter and Helen Bing Senior Fellow
Robert and Marion Oster Distinguished Military Fellow
George P. Shultz Senior Fellow in Foreign Policy and National Security Affairs, Emeritus
Pragmatic Engagement Amidst Global Uncertainty: Three Major Challenges, a national security strategy written by the Hoover Institution’s Working Group on Foreign Policy and Grand Strategy.
Featured

Hoover Institution Bipartisan Working Group Releases National Security Strategy For The Future

Wednesday, February 3, 2016
Stanford

The Hoover Institution today released Pragmatic Engagement Amidst Global Uncertainty: Three Major Challenges, a national security strategy written by the Hoover Institution’s Working Group on Foreign Policy and Grand Strategy. 

Press Releases

The Hoover Institution's Working Group on Foreign Policy and Grand Strategy will explore an array of foreign policy topics over a two-year period. Our goal is to develop orienting principles about the most important policy challenges to better serve America's interests.

The certainties of the Cold War, such as they were, have disappeared. The United States now confronts several historically unique challenges, including the rise of a potential peer competitor, a rate of technological change unseen since the 19th century, the proliferation of nuclear and biological capabilities, and the possible joining of these capabilities with transnational terrorist movements. There has been no consensus on a grand strategy or even a set of principles to address specific problems. Reactive and ad hoc measures are not adequate.