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Analysis and Commentary

The Plight of Immigrants from Mexico

by Edward Paul Lazearvia Hoover Daily Report
Wednesday, November 10, 2004

Mexicans often do poorly because they have been part of a large wave of immigrants who have similar cultures, languages, and backgrounds.

Analysis and Commentary

When Jobs Are Illegal, Only Illegals Will Have Jobs

by Jennifer Roback Morsevia Hoover Daily Report
Monday, March 15, 2004

Mandated benefits make the young, the low-skilled, and the poorly educated legally unemployable.

MIGRATION HEADACHE: President Bush's Immigration Plan

with Tamar Jacoby, Mark Krikorianvia Uncommon Knowledge
Wednesday, March 3, 2004

It is estimated that currently there are between 7 and 10 million illegal immigrants in this country. Meanwhile the Border Patrol has grown from a staff of 2,000 and a $100 million budget 30 years ago to 11,000 men and women and a $9 billion budget today. Clearly, our attempts to control illegal immigration have not been working. But what should we do instead? President Bush has proposed a new immigration plan that would turn illegal immigrants already here into legal temporary workers. Is his plan an acknowledgment that our economy needs cheap immigrant labor and that we simply can't control our borders any longer? Or is his plan the entirely wrong way to address the immigration problem?

Making and Remaking America: Immigration into the United States

by Peter J. Duignanvia Analysis
Monday, September 15, 2003

Continued immigration constantly reshapes the demography, economy, and society of the United States. As a country of immigrants, America must respond to three fundamental immigration questions: how many immigrants should be admitted; from where and in what status should they arrive; and how should the rules governing the system be enforced?

During the 1980s and 1990s, the U.S. Congress responded to growing gaps between immigration policy and immigration reality by making major changes in immigration laws and their administration. In 1986, the United States enacted the world’s largest legalization program for unauthorized foreigners and introduced sanctions on employers who knowingly hired illegal foreign workers. Instead of slowing illegal immigration, however, this program allowed more foreigners to arrive legally and illegally, which prompted another round of reforms in 1996 aimed at ensuring that new arrivals would not receive welfare payments.

On September 11, 2001, foreigners in the United States hijacked four commercial planes. Two were flown into the World Trade Center towers in New York City, bringing them down and killing 3,000 people. President George W. Bush declared war on terrorists and the countries that harbor them, and Congress enacted legislation to fight terrorism. This includes new measures for tightening procedures for issuing visas to foreign visitors, tracking foreign students and visitors while they are in the United States, and giving immigration authorities new power to arrest and detain foreigners suspected of ties to terrorism. The Immigration and Naturalization Service was abolished, and its functions of preventing illegal immigration and providing services to foreign visitors and immigrants were separated in the new Department of Homeland Security.

However, anti-terrorism measures have not slowed immigration to the United States. America is poised to remain the world’s major destination for immigrants, and as patterns in U.S. history suggest, most of the newcomers will soon become Americans. However, past success in integrating immigrants does not guarantee that integrating newcomers will be easy or automatic. As immigrants continue to make and remake the country, the United States must develop an immigration policy for the twenty-first century.

SOUTHERN EXPOSURE: Mexican Immigration

with Victor Davis Hanson, Richard Rodriguezvia Uncommon Knowledge
Tuesday, August 26, 2003

How is Mexican immigration changing the United States in the twenty-first century? In the past several decades, the United States has seen an explosion in the number of Hispanic immigrants to this country, most of them from Mexico. And most of them go to California. Today nearly half of all Californians are immigrants or the children of immigrants—most of them coming originally from Mexico. What is the economic and social impact of this influx on California, and what does it bode for the rest of the country? What makes Mexican immigration different than immigration from other countries? And what, if anything, should we do about it?

Faces of American Islam

by Daniel Pipesvia Policy Review
Thursday, August 1, 2002

The challenge of Muslim immigration

TEST TUBE AMERICA: Immigration

with Michael Barone, Peter Skerryvia Uncommon Knowledge
Tuesday, January 22, 2002

In 1965, Congress voted to change the laws that had restricted immigration into the United States for more than four decades. The Immigration Act of 1965 resulted in a wave of increased immigration that continues today. How do recent immigrant groups compare with those of the last great wave of immigration a century ago? Are they successfully integrating into American culture or threatening America's cultural stability? Should immigration once again be restricted, or should we concern ourselves with helping immigrants assimilate when they arrive?

The Welcome Effects of Latino Immigration

by Michael Baronevia Hoover Digest
Saturday, January 30, 1999

Since minorities can’t rely on the market to provide jobs and safe neighborhoods, the 1968 Kerner Report suggested, they need something like socialism instead. In the thirty years since, Latino immigrants have proved otherwise. By Hoover media fellow Michael Barone.

Barbarians inside the Gates and Other Controversial Essays

by Thomas Sowellvia Books by Hoover Fellows
Friday, January 1, 1999

A collection of essays that discusses such issues as the media, immigration, the minimum wage and multiculturalism.

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Send Me Your Skilled, Your Trained, Your Electrical Engineers . . .

by Joseph B. Costello, Lance Director Nagelvia Hoover Digest
Thursday, April 30, 1998

Ever heard of an H-1B visa? You would have if you worked in high tech. Hoover fellow Nicholas Imparato joins Joseph B. Costello and Lance Director Nagel in arguing that the computer industry needs immigrants—lots of them.

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Immigration Reform Initiative


The Conte Initiative on Immigration Reform aims to improve immigration law by providing innovative ideas and clear improvements to every part of the system, from border security to green cards to temporary work visas.