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In the News

The Wall By The Numbers

quoting Victor Davis Hansonvia The Patriot Post
Friday, January 18, 2019

Historian Victor Davis Hanson recently wrote, “There are 11 million to 13 million Mexican citizens currently living in the United States illegally.” (It may be closer to 22 million.) He continued, “Millions more emigrated previously and are now U.S. citizens. A recent poll revealed that one-third of Mexicans (34 percent) would like to emigrate to the United States. With Mexico having a population of about 130 million, that amounts to some 44 million would-be immigrants. Such massive potential emigration into the United States makes no sense.”

Blank Section (Placeholder)Analysis and Commentary

Area 45: Is It Constitutional? Featuring Richard Epstein

interview with Richard A. Epsteinvia Area 45
Wednesday, January 23, 2019

What does the Constitution allow in terms of executive power and impeachment proceedings?

IntellectionsFeatured

Enhancing Economic Growth Through Immigration

by Edward Paul Lazearvia PolicyEd
Thursday, January 17, 2019

Immigration has always been a vital component of economic growth in the United States, and certain types of immigrants are more likely to start businesses than others. Younger, more educated immigrants are more likely to be entrepreneurial, as are immigrants who come from countries that haven’t traditionally sent many people to America. The United States could boost its economy if it rebalanced its immigration system to give them a preferred path for green cards.

Analysis and Commentary

Does A Border Wall Enhance Home Values?

by Timothy Kanevia Balance of Economics
Wednesday, January 16, 2019

What is the value of building a barrier between countries? While President Trump is fond of the refrain, “A country without borders is not a country at all,” the reality is more complex. 

Blank Section (Placeholder)Featured

Area 45: The Lowdown On The Shutdown With David Brady

interview with David Bradyvia Area 45
Tuesday, January 15, 2019

Has the Shutdown which is based on funding for the border wall hurt or helped President Trump’s popularity?

The Classicist with Victor Davis Hanson:
Blank Section (Placeholder)Analysis and Commentary

The Classicist: Immigration, Assimilation, And The Wall

interview with Victor Davis Hansonvia The Classicist
Tuesday, January 15, 2019

Why tougher immigration enforcement would lead to more diversity.

Analysis and Commentary

Trumpman’s Winning Wall

by Niall Fergusonvia Boston Globe
Monday, January 14, 2019

As so often, “South Park” saw it coming. In “The Last of the Meheecans”— which first aired back in October 2011 — the obnoxious Cartman joins the US Border Patrol, only to find himself facing the wrong way as hordes of disillusioned Mexican workers seek to flee the economically depressed United States back to Mexico.

Analysis and Commentary

Facts About “The Wall” & The US Government Shutdown

by Timothy Kanevia Balance of Economics
Sunday, January 13, 2019

There’s one bizarre fact that surprises both advocates and opponents of President Donald Trump’s commitment to building a wall along the US-Mexico border. Advocates demand the wall be built, and note that Trump was elected president with this mandate. Opponents insist that a wall must never be built. Just to be clear, we argued against a “Great Wall of Texas” in an Atlantic essay over five years ago.

Analysis and Commentary

The Courts Won’t Stop Trump’s Emergency Declaration Or His Border Wall

by John Yoovia Los Angeles Times
Friday, January 11, 2019

President Trump’s threat to declare a national emergency and build a wall along the U.S.-Mexico border may not be sound policy, but the president’s critics are wrong when they say he cannot constitutionally do it. If Trump makes good on his plans, he would almost certainly win in court.

In the News

Trump Eases Off Using Disaster Relief Funds For His Wall After Bipartisan Pushback

quoting Alice Hillvia Washington Examiner
Friday, January 11, 2019

The Trump administration is appearing to ease off a plan to use disaster relief funding to build a border wall amid bipartisan pushback, allies say. White House officials told various news outlets Thursday that President Trump is weighing using billions of dollars of Army Corps of Engineers funding allocated for states and territories suffering from storm or wildfire damage, including Puerto Rico, Florida, Texas, and California, in order to get around Congress and build his border wall.

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Immigration Reform Initiative


The Conte Initiative on Immigration Reform aims to improve immigration law by providing innovative ideas and clear improvements to every part of the system, from border security to green cards to temporary work visas.