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Episode 59: Niall Ferguson

interview with Niall Fergusonvia The Jamie Weinstein Show
Tuesday, May 15, 2018

Hoover Institution fellow Niall Ferguson talks about how the Trump administration is doing after a year in office, the state of the world, his book The Square And The Tower, hotspots around the world from China to North Korea to Saudi Arabia, and much more.

Analysis and Commentary

Needed: An FDA Revolution

by Joseph V. Gulfo, Henry I. Millervia City Journal
Wednesday, May 2, 2018

To conquer crippling diseases like Alzheimer’s, the agency must change its whole approach to clinical drug trials.

In the News

“I’m Scared Of That World”

featuring Michael McFaulvia Slate
Thursday, May 10, 2018

A former U.S. ambassador to Russia on the disinformation campaign against him—and Russia’s increasingly sophisticated attacks on reality.

In the News

Citrix Synergy: Condoleezza Rice Philosophises On Tech Neutrality

featuring Condoleezza Ricevia IT Web
Thursday, May 10, 2018

Technology and innovations are changing patterns of behaviour and how we live more rapidly than anything in history.

In the News

Silicon Valley Deletes The Pro-Life Campaign In Ireland

quoting Niall Fergusonvia The National Review
Wednesday, May 9, 2018

Are Google and Facebook rigging the referendum?

Just The Fracts

Top 5 Reasons Fracking Regulations Are Whack

by Terry Anderson, Carson Brunovia PolicyEd.org
Wednesday, May 18, 2016

The current approach to mitigating hydraulic fracturing’s risks is top-down, command-and-control government regulation. But this system is highly inefficient and ineffective at balancing the risks and rewards of fracturing. Why? Regulation imposes costs on consumers, typically benefits special interests, limits competition, and shields bad actors from liability. Meanwhile, property rights and water markets can better mitigate the risks, while also promoting the benefits.

Just The Fracts

Swipe Right: Seeking Fracturing Policy Alternatives

by Terry Anderson, Carson Brunovia PolicyEd.org
Wednesday, January 20, 2016

Requiring hydraulic fracturing operators to tag their fracturing fluids with tracers helps enforce the property rights of others who may be harmed. This, in turn, enables more use of insurance, surety bonding, self-regulation, and third-party verification/certification to reduce and protect against the real but rare risks of fracturing. Property rights hold producers accountable and take advantage of fracturing benefits.

Just The Fracts

Getting The Fracts Straight

by Terry Anderson, Carson Brunovia PolicyEd.org
Wednesday, January 20, 2016

All forms of energy production have their risks, but scientific research suggests that hydraulic fracturing’s risks of water use, water contamination, or induced seismic activity from improper fluid disposal are rare, overblown, or easily mitigated. Like other energy productions, we have to weigh the risks and rewards. Estimates suggest fracturing will create almost 4 million jobs and pump almost $500 billion in the U.S.’s economy by 2035.

In the News

Stock Buybacks By Apple, Other Tech Giants: Who Benefits?

quoting Michael J. Boskinvia Post Bulletin
Monday, May 7, 2018

On a year expected to bring a record amount in company stock buybacks, Silicon Valley tech giants are leading the way.

In the News

Tech Founders Embraced Control Over Companies. This One Is Giving It Up.

quoting Laurie Simon Hodrickvia The New York Times
Wednesday, May 2, 2018

For more than a decade, some of the best known technology companies, including Google, Facebook and Snap, have sold shares to the public while maintaining a corporate structure that allowed their founders to keep tight control over their companies.

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Energy Policy Task Force


The Task Force on Energy Policy addresses energy policy in the United States and its effects on our domestic and international political priorities, particularly our national security.