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Two Videos

by John H. Cochrane via The Grumpy Economist
Thursday, May 16, 2019

My Hoover colleague Russ Roberts just finished a nice video on inequality. Among other takeaways, he stresses that the people who were rich in 1980 are not the same people or even families who are rich now. It is not true that "the rich got richer." He also tracks individuals through time, and poor individuals got richer to. There is a lot more economic mobility in the US than the standard talking points.

In the News

Ayaan Hirsi Ali Warns Of Islamic Anti-Semitism

quoting Ayaan Hirsi Alivia The Canadian Jewish News
Wednesday, May 15, 2019

Islamic anti-Semitism is of a “scale and scope” that most people in the West do not understand and is therefore all the more insidious, the controversial critic of the Muslim religion, Ayaan Hirsi Ali, told a capacity audience at the Jewish Public Library (JPL) in Montreal on May 13.

Analysis and Commentary

Sanders And AOC's Elitist Credit Card Caps

by David R. Hendersonvia EconLog
Wednesday, May 15, 2019

Senator Bernie Sanders and Representative Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez have announced plans to introduce legislation that would limit the interest rate that credit card companies are allowed to charge customers. Although there is currently no federal limit, some state governments have limits. Sanders and Ocasio-Cortez propose capping the annual rate of interest on credit card debt at 15 percent.

Analysis and Commentary

New American Schools: A Short, Opinionated History, Part II

by Chester E. Finn Jr.via Thomas Fordham Institute
Wednesday, May 15, 2019
This essay is part of the The Moonshot for Kids project, a joint initiative of the Fordham Institute and the Center for American Progress. This is the second of three parts. The first ran last week, and the third will appear in the next issue of the Education Gadfly Weekly.
Featured

Our Modern ‘Satyricon’

by Victor Davis Hansonvia American Greatness
Wednesday, May 15, 2019

Sometime around A.D. 60, in the age of Emperor Nero, a Roman court insider named Gaius Petronius wrote a satirical Latin novel, “The Satyricon,” about moral corruption in Imperial Rome. The novel’s general landscape was Rome’s transition from an agrarian republic to a globalized multicultural superpower.

In the News

Critics' Picks: The Best Arts Events In Town This Week

mentioning Elizabeth Cobbsvia Charleston City Paper
Wednesday, May 15, 2019

Join author Elizabeth Cobbs for a book talk about her newest historical novel, The Tubman Command. A book signing follows the reading.

In the News

Durham Vs. The Deep State

quoting John Yoovia Patriot Post
Wednesday, May 15, 2019

Drug stores in deep state neighborhoods around Washington, D.C., reported a run on Maalox after news broke that Attorney General William Barr had appointed Connecticut U.S. Attorney John Durham to investigate the origins of the Trump/Russia collusion hoax.

In the News

Now You See It, Now You Don’t

quoting Jack Goldsmithvia Antiwar.com
Wednesday, May 15, 2019

Back in 2012, I stumbled across figures on the U.S. government’s classification of documents and was stunned. In 2011, 92,064,862 of them had been sequestered and 26,058,678 of those given “top secret” status. (Who even knew that so many documents could be generated by a single government?) And that top-secret figure, in turn, represented a jump of 20,373,216 over all the documents classified in 1995. As such, it offered a striking sense of just how “secure” America’s national security state, including its (by then) 17 intelligence agencies, had become.

In the News

College Athletes May See A Payday Soon, But The Money Won't Come From The NCAA

quoting Condoleezza Ricevia Courier Journal
Wednesday, May 15, 2019

The NCAA’s new working group is tasked with holding back the tide. It is charged with examining rights that would seem inalienable – a college athlete’s claim to his or her own name, likeness and image – while preserving the pretense of amateurism.

HousingAnalysis and Commentary

Why California May Be The Cure For What Ails Harry And Meghan

by Bill Whalenvia California on Your Mind
Thursday, May 16, 2019

This December marks 52 years since a British queen made Southern California her new home—not an actual monarch, mind you, but the legendary ocean liner Queen Mary that remains to this day a tourist attraction in Long Beach.

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