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World Order

by Henry A. Kissingervia Penguin Press
Tuesday, September 9, 2014

Henry Kissinger has traveled the world, advised presidents, and been a close observer and participant in the central foreign policy events of our era. Now he offers his analysis of the twenty first century’s ultimate challenge: how to build a shared international order in a world of divergent historic perspectives, violent conflict, proliferating technology, and ideological extremism.

Conservative Internationalism: Armed Diplomacy under Jefferson, Polk, Truman, and Reagan

by Henry R. Nauvia Princeton University Press
Sunday, September 15, 2013

Debates about U.S. foreign policy have revolved around three main traditions--liberal internationalism, realism, and nationalism. In this book, distinguished political scientist Henry Nau delves deeply into a fourth, overlooked foreign policy tradition that he calls "conservative internationalism."

Nuclear Security: The Problems and the Road Ahead by Secretary George Shultz

Nuclear Security: The Problems and the Road Ahead

by George P. Shultz, Sidney D. Drell, Henry A. Kissinger, Sam Nunnvia Hoover Press
Tuesday, September 9, 2014

Concern about the threat posed by nuclear weapons has preoccupied the United States and presidents of the United States since the beginning of the nuclear era.

The Taylor Rule and the Transformation of Monetary Policy

The Taylor Rule and the Transformation of Monetary Policy

via Hoover Press
Wednesday, June 13, 2012

Twenty years ago, John Taylor proposed a simple idea to guide monetary policy. Quickly the idea spread, not only through academia, but also to the trading floors of Wall Street and the Federal Reserve's boardroom in Washington. Now, two decades later, the Taylor rule remains a focal point for discussions of monetary policy around the world.

Iraq after America: Strongmen, Sectarians, Resistance

Iraq after America: Strongmen, Sectarians, Resistance

by Colonel Joel Rayburnvia Hoover Press
Friday, August 1, 2014

More than a decade after the US-led invasion of Iraq, most studies of the Iraq conflict focus on the twin questions of whether the United States should have entered Iraq in 2003 and whether it  should have exited in 2011, but few have examined the new Iraqi state and society on its own merits.

How Big Banks Fail and What to Do about It

by Darrell Duffievia Princeton University Press
Sunday, November 7, 2010

Dealer banks--that is, large banks that deal in securities and derivatives, such as J. P. Morgan and Goldman Sachs--are of a size and complexity that sharply distinguish them from typical commercial banks. When they fail, as we saw in the global financial crisis, they pose significant risks to our financial system and the world economy. How Big Banks Fail and What to Do about It examines how these banks collapse and how we can prevent the need to bail them out.

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Getting Off Track: How Government Actions and Interventions Caused, Prolonged, and Worsened the Financial Crisis

by John B. Taylorvia Hoover Press
Thursday, February 26, 2009

Throughout history, financial crises have always been caused by excesses—frequently monetary excesses—which lead to a boom and an inevitable bust. In our current crisis it was a housing boom and bust that in turn led to financial turmoil in the United States and other countries.

Putting Our House in Order: A Guide to Social Security and Health Care Reform

Putting Our House in Order: A Guide to Social Security and Health Care Reform

by George P. Shultz, John Shovenvia W. W. Norton & Company
Thursday, April 17, 2008

Of all the issues swirling around the 2008 election, the staggering projected costs for the upkeep of America's largest entitlement programs—Social Security, Medicare, and Medicaid—loom with gathering intensity.

Economics Abstract

Resolution of Failed Financial Institutions: Orderly Liquidation Authority and a New Chapter 14

by Thomas Jackson, Kenneth E. Scott, Kimberly Anne Summe, John B. Taylorvia Analysis
Monday, April 25, 2011
Studies by the Resolution Project at Stanford University’s Hoover Institution Working Group on Economic Policy.
 
The purpose of this short collection of papers is to demonstrate why the "orderly liquidation authority" in Title II of the Dodd–Frank bill “Wall Street Reform and Consumer Protection Act of 2010” should be supplemented with a new and more predictable bankruptcy process designed specifically for large financial institutions. 

The Squam Lake Report: Fixing the Financial System

by Darrell Duffie, John H. Cochrane via Princeton University Press
Monday, June 14, 2010

In the fall of 2008, fifteen of the world's leading economists--representing the broadest spectrum of economic opinion--gathered at New Hampshire's Squam Lake. Their goal: the mapping of a long-term plan for financial regulation reform.

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