David Brady

Davies Family Senior Fellow
Research Team: 
Awards and Honors:
American Academy of Arts and Sciences
Biography: 

David Brady holds the Bowen H. and Janice Arthur McCoy Professor of Political Science in the Stanford Graduate School of Business and is the Davies Family Senior Fellow at the Hoover Institution.  He has published seven books and more than a hundred papers in journals and books.  Among his most recent books are Leadership and Growth (World Bank Publications, 2010) with Michael Spence, Revolving Gridlock: Politics and Policy from Carter to Bush II (Westview Press, 2006), and Red and Blue Nation? Characteristics and Causes of America’s Polarized Politics with Pietro Nivola (Brookings Institution Press, 2007).  His recent articles include “Why Is Health Care Reform So Difficult?” with Daniel Kessler, Journal of Health Politics, Policy and Law, April 2010; “Putting the Public’s Money Where Its Mouth Is”  with Daniel Kessler, Health Affairs: The Policy Journal of the Health Sphere, August 2009, pages 917–25; “Leadership and Politics: A Perspective from the Growth Commission,” with Michael Spence, Oxford Review of Economic Policy, 25, no. 2 (2009): 205–18; “The 2010 Elections: Why Did Political Science Forecasts Go Awry?” with Morris P. Fiorina and Arjun Wilkins, 2011.

Brady has been on continual appointment at Stanford University since 1986, where he has served as associate dean for Academic Affairs in the Graduate School of Business (GSB) and as vice provost for Distance Learning.  He has twice been a fellow at the Center for Advanced Study in the Behavioral Sciences and was elected to the American Academy of Arts and Sciences in 1987.  He presently holds the Bowen H. and Janice Arthur McCoy Professorship in Ethics at the Business School and was deputy director of the Hoover Institution from 2004-2014.

During his teaching career, he won the Dinkelspiel Award for service to undergraduates, the Richard Lyman Prize for service to alumni, the Bob Davies Award and the Jaedicke Silver Cup from the GSB, and the first Phi Beta Kappa Teaching Award given at Stanford.  He also won the George Brown Teaching Award at Rice University.

Filter By:

Topic

Type

Recent Commentary

Megamergers—and Megafallacies

by David Bradyvia Hoover Digest
Friday, April 30, 1999

Is the recent wave of corporate megamergers cause for alarm? On the contrary, argues Hoover fellow David W. Brady. The new corporate giants are incorporating the best management techniques from around the world. Bigger isn’t better. Better is better.

STATUTE WITH LIMITATIONS: The Independent Counsel Statute

with David Brady, James J. Brosnahan, John Donohuevia Uncommon Knowledge
Tuesday, January 12, 1999

The independent counsel statute was passed by Congress as a response to Watergate. And it has been the subject of controversy and criticism ever since. This year the statute is up for renewal. David Brady, Hoover Institution Senior Fellow, Associate Dean and Bowen H. and Janice Arthur McCoy Professor of Political Science, Business and the Changing Environment, and Ethics at the Stanford Graduate School of Business, Professor, Department of Political Science at Stanford University, James J. Brosnahan, Senior Partner at Morrison & Foerster, Attorneys at Law, and John Donohue, Professor, Stanford Law School discuss whether Congress should reenact it, reform it, or let it die?

Why Can’t Congress Get More Done?

by David Brady, Craig Voldenvia Hoover Digest
Thursday, July 30, 1998

The 103d Congress was controlled by Democrats. It didn’t accomplish much. The 104th Congress was controlled by Republicans. It didn’t accomplish much either. Why? Hoover fellow David W. Brady joins Hoover visiting scholar Craig Volden in explaining that there are some very good answers.

Campaign Finance: Roll Back the Reforms

by David Brady, Nelson W. Polsby, Peter M. Robinsonvia Hoover Digest
Wednesday, July 30, 1997

Hoover fellow David Brady and Berkeley political scientist Nelson W. Polsby believe we need fewer limits on political contributions, not more. An interview by Hoover fellow Peter Robinson.

Why House Republicans Are Right to Be Right

by John F. Cogan, David Brady, Douglas Riversvia Hoover Digest
Wednesday, April 30, 1997

The Contract with America was so far to the right that it only hurt House Republicans, right? Wrong. Hoover fellows David Brady, John F. Cogan, and Douglas Rivers join together for an analysis of the 1996 election results.

POLITICAL TECTONICS

with David Brady, Nelson W. Polsbyvia Uncommon Knowledge
Monday, April 7, 1997

Nelson Polsby, professor of political science, University of California, Berkeley and Hoover Fellow David Brady discuss the implications of Republican houses of Congress and a Democratic president.

The 1996 House Elections: Reaffirming the Conservative Trend

by John F. Cogan, David Bradyvia Analysis
Saturday, March 1, 1997

Before last November's election, the conventional wisdom was that Republicans would experience large losses in Congress. The party of Newt Gingrich had supposedly put its majority at risk by pursuing an aggressive legislative agenda that was too extreme for mainstream America. Many pundits argued that the Republican majority would suffer the same as its predecessors in 1948 and 1954: two years and out.
 

But the electorate confounded the experts by reelecting a GOP House majority for the first time since 1930. How did conventional wisdom miss the mark so badly? This essay provides an assessment of the November House elections.
 

Republicans in the 104th Congress had the most conservative voting record of any Congress in the post-World War II era. Its record for conservative voting shattered the previous record set by Republicans in 1949. Voters registered their overwhelming approval of this agenda by returning 92 percent of the incumbent House Republicans to office. Our statistical analysis reveals no evidence that House Republicans who did lose were defeated because of their support for conservative votes. In fact, Republican winners had slightly more conservative voting records than losers. This holds even when the analysis is confined to Republicans in moderate-to-liberal congressional districts. Likewise, there is no evidence that voting for the Contract with America harmed reelection prospects of Republicans from moderate-to-liberal districts. Finally, there is no statistical evidence that organized labor' s $35 million campaign had any impact on election outcomes involving Republican freshmen.
 

Continued conservative dominance of Congress seems likely for the remainder of this century. In every off-year presidential election since the Civil War, except one, the party of the president has lost seats in the House. Republicans continue to run well in southern and border states and are in a position to continue to gain seats in these regions. Democratic members are expected to continue to retire at higher rates than Republican members.

THE ONE PERCENT SOLUTION?

with Michael J. Boskin, David Bradyvia Uncommon Knowledge
Monday, February 24, 1997

Hoover fellows Michael Boskin and David Brady discuss why it's important to adjust the CPI now and whether it's politically possible to do so.

Pages