Paul R. Gregory

Research Fellow
Biography: 

Paul Gregory is a research fellow at the Hoover Institution. He holds an endowed professorship in the Department of Economics at the University of Houston, Texas, is a research professor at the German Institute for Economic Research in Berlin, and is emeritus chair of the International Advisory Board of the Kiev School of Economics. Gregory has held visiting teaching appointments at Moscow State University, Viadrina University, and the Free University of Berlin. He blogs on national and international economic topics at http://www.forbes.com/sites/paulroderickgregory/ and http://paulgregorysblog.blogspot.com/.

The holder of a PhD in economics from Harvard University, he is the author or coauthor of twelve books and more than one hundred articles on economic history, the Soviet economy, transition economies, comparative economics, and economic demography. Gregory’s economics papers have been published in American Economic Review, Econometrica, Quarterly Journal of Economics, Review of Economics and Statistics, Journal of Political Economy, Journal of Economic History, and the Journal of Comparative Economics.  His most recent books are Women of the Gulag: Portraits of Five Remarkable Lives (Hoover Institution Press, 2013), Politics, Murder, and Love in Stalin's Kremlin: The Story of Nikolai Bukharin and Anna Larina (Hoover Institution Press, 2010), Lenin’s Brain and Other Tales from the Secret Soviet Archives (Hoover Institution Press, 2008), Terror by Quota (Yale, 2009), and The Political Economy of Stalinism (Cambridge, 2004), which won the Hewett Prize. He edited The Lost Transcripts of the Politburo (Yale, 2008), Behind the Façade of Stalin's Command Economy (Hoover, 2001), and The Economics of Forced Labor: The Soviet Gulag (Hoover, 2003). The work of his Hoover Soviet Archives Research Project team is summarized in "Allocation under Dictatorship: Research in Stalin's Archive" (coauthored with Hoover fellow Mark Harrison), published in the Journal of Economic Literature.

Gregory has also published The Global Economy and Its Economic Systems (Cengage, 2013) and is working with director Marianna Yarovskaya on a film documentary entitled Women of the Gulag.

Gregory also served on the editorial board of the seven-volume Gulag documentary series entitled The History of the Stalin Gulag, published jointly by the Hoover Institution and the Russian Archival Service. He also serves or has served on the editorial boards of Comparative Economic Studies, Slavic Review, Journal of Comparative Economics, Problems of Post-Communism, and Explorations in Economic History.

His research papers are available at the Hoover Institution Archives.

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Putin
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My War With Russian Trolls

by Paul R. Gregoryvia Defining Ideas
Wednesday, March 21, 2018

How Putin's propaganda machine takes on Moscow's critics.

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Overlooked In Putin's Reelection: The Kremlin's Challenge Is From The Left

by Paul R. Gregoryvia Forbes
Tuesday, March 20, 2018

Vladimir Putin has destroyed his liberal-democratic opposition led by Alexei Navalny and the late Boris Nemtsov through repression. The March 2018 election reveals that danger to the Putin regime comes from a communist left reconstituted along European lines. This takeaway from March 18 has been overlooked by foreign observers.

Putin
Analysis and Commentary

Putin's Nuclear Posturing Part Of Effort To Win Back Displeased Public

by Paul R. Gregoryvia The Hill
Monday, March 5, 2018

Vladimir Putin served up his election platform for his perfunctory March 18 re-election in his annual address to the two houses of Russia’s parliament on Thursday. Putin addressed two audiences — the Russian people and his external enemies, namely the U.S. and NATO.

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Did The FBI Vouch For The Crazy Russian Deal From The Steele Dossier?

by Paul R. Gregoryvia Forbes
Tuesday, January 30, 2018

Any FISA judge who issued surveillance warrants against Page based on this tall tale would have to have his head examined.

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A Grand Korea Bargain

by Paul R. Gregoryvia Hoover Digest
Friday, January 26, 2018

The Koreas will not reunite, nor will the North disarm. We can still build something durable on that cracked foundation. 

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Why Socialism Fails

by Paul R. Gregoryvia Defining Ideas
Wednesday, January 10, 2018

The Soviet disaster shows that modern economies are too complex to plan. 

Putin
Analysis and Commentary

Trump Should Be Wary Of Putin's 'Truth'-Telling

by Paul R. Gregoryvia The Hill
Tuesday, November 14, 2017

Donald Trump, in his brief encounters with Russia’s president at the Asia Pacific Conference in the Philippines, got ensnared in a linguistic entanglement over Vladimir Putin’s declaration that he “believed” Russia did not intervene in the United States election.

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Manafort, Podesta Group Highlight DC Swamp Culture

by Paul R. Gregoryvia The Hill
Tuesday, October 31, 2017

Back in February I wrote a piece titled, “No one mentions that the Russian trial leads to Democratic lobbyists.” The article described the ties between “hired-gun” Washington lobbyists and their rogue’s gallery of Russian and Ukrainian clients — some fugitives, others barred from entry into the United States — along with companies closely allied with the Kremlin.

Analysis and Commentary

Steele Dossier Farce Shows Why Trump Relies On Twitter

by Paul R. Gregoryvia The Hill
Friday, October 27, 2017

The media refrain on the Trump dossier has been that “considerable amounts of it have been proven.” No one had explained exactly what has been proven, however, until The Washington Post decided to answer the question itself.

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Why Was Obama's Justice Department Silent On Criminal Activity By Russia's Nuclear Agency?

by Paul R. Gregoryvia Forbes
Wednesday, October 25, 2017

An investigative piece in The Hill shows that the FBI knew, as of November 2009, of criminal activities by Tenex, the U.S. affiliate of Russia’s nuclear energy agency, Rosatom. At that time, Rosatom was authorized to ship spent fuel from Russian nuclear power plants to customers in the United States. Justice Department documents show that Tenex executives instructed a subcontracting U.S. trucking firm, in late November of 2009, to pad its prices in a no-bid process and to wire transfer the difference to offshore accounts. FBI records show a series of subsequent Tenex kickbacks and money laundering transactions.

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