Tom Church

Policy Fellow
Biography: 

Tom Church is a policy fellow at the Hoover Institution. He studies health care policy, entitlement reform, income inequality, poverty, and the federal budget. He also contributes to PolicyEd, the Hoover Institution’s initiative to educate Americans about public policy.

He has researched the fiscal effects of major health care proposals. In 2015 he edited the book Inequality & Economic Policy: Essays in Memory of Gary Becker with John B. Taylor and Chris Miller. He also hosts The Libertarian podcast with Richard Epstein.

Church received his master’s degree in public policy with honors from Pepperdine University, specializing in economics and international relations. He has a bachelor’s degree in mathematics and political science from the University of Michigan.

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Recent Commentary

Analysis and Commentary

Biden's Medicare Plan Spells Trouble For The Whole System

by Lanhee J. Chen, Daniel Heil, Tom Churchvia The Hill
Monday, June 28, 2021

The Supreme Court has once again upheld the Affordable Care Act. Now, President Biden and congressional democrats are looking to put their own mark on the nation’s health care system. The administration recently proposed lowering Medicare’s eligibility age, and Senate Democrats are apparently eager to include the reform in their forthcoming $6 trillion reconciliation bill.

Featured

The Fiscal Costs Of Medicare At 60

by Lanhee J. Chen, Tom Church, Daniel Heilvia Hoover Daily Report
Wednesday, June 23, 2021

This paper analyzes the budget effects of lowering Medicare’s eligibility age to 60. We find that if the newly eligible population is subject to the same rules as current Medicare recipients, nearly 14 million 60- to 64-year-olds would enroll in Medicare Part A, about 8 million would enroll in Part B, and 6.5 million would enroll in Part D. Gross Medicare expenditures would rise by $82.9 billion in 2022. 

Policy InsightsFeatured

Cybersecurity

featuring Jacquelyn Schneider, Amy Zegart, H. R. McMaster, Herbert Lin, Tom Churchvia PolicyEd
Thursday, May 27, 2021

From pipeline hacks leading to gasoline shortages to disinformation campaigns during elections, cyberattacks are becoming a more frequent source of disruption in people’s lives. Finding the right responses to these attacks isn’t obvious. Can we take lessons from traditional warfare, or do cyberattacks demand an entirely different response?

Cybersecurity

by Daniel Heil featuring the work of Jacquelyn Schneider, Amy Zegart, H. R. McMaster, Herbert Lin, Tom Churchvia Policy Insights | A Succinct Guide to Important Policy Questions
Tuesday, May 25, 2021

From pipeline hacks leading to gasoline shortages to disinformation campaigns during elections, cyberattacks are becoming a more frequent source of disruption in people’s lives. Finding the right responses to these attacks isn’t obvious. Can we take lessons from traditional warfare, or do cyberattacks demand an entirely different response?

Analysis and Commentary

Medicare At 60: A Preliminary Overview

by Lanhee J. Chen, Tom Church, Daniel Heilvia Hoover Daily Report
Tuesday, April 27, 2021

In April 2020, then-presidential-candidate Joe Biden proposed lowering the Medicare eligibility age from 65 to 60. Surprisingly, Medicare at 60 and its likely consequences—from how many people it would cover to its fiscal costs— have not been explored in much depth.2 The current proposal comes with several unanswered policy questions. Would coverage be mandatory or voluntary? Would new recipients be subject to the same rules as traditional Medicare enrollees or have their own rules? Would late-enrollment penalties apply to individuals who wait until 65 to enroll? 

Analysis and Commentary

A Public Option For Health Insurance Could Be A Disaster, Especially In Times Of Crisis

by Lanhee J. Chen, Tom Church, Daniel Heilvia Stat
Thursday, February 11, 2021

In a step to help more Americans get health insurance, President Biden signed an executive order creating an additional opportunity for Americans to sign up for subsidized coverage on the health insurance marketplaces created by the Affordable Care Act.

Analysis and Commentary

Economic Shocks And Probable Expansions To A Public Option

by Lanhee J. Chen, Tom Church, Daniel Heilvia Hoover Daily Report
Thursday, February 4, 2021

A politically realistic public option would have significant impacts on America’s future fiscal condition. These impacts would be exacerbated by the kinds of economic shocks, such as recessions, that our country has seen on a fairly regular basis.

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The Budget and Tax Effects of a Federal Public Option After COVID-19

by Lanhee J. Chen, Tom Church, Daniel Heilvia Hoover Daily Report
Tuesday, October 20, 2020

A public option that follows historical trends would become the third-largest federal spending program and increase deficits by almost $800 billion over ten years. These increases are particularly problematic given the significant increases in deficits fueled by the relief packages enacted in the wake of the COVID-19 pandemic.

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The American Labor Market

by Daniel Heil featuring the work of Edward Paul Lazear, Lee Ohanian, Russ Roberts, David R. Henderson, Margaret (Macke) Raymond, Tom Churchvia Policy Insights | A Succinct Guide to Important Policy Questions
Monday, July 20, 2020

With COVID-19 wreaking havoc on the US economy, it is easy to be pessimistic about the future job market. The unemployment rate is in double digits and millions of households are now relying on federal unemployment benefits to survive. Nevertheless, the United States is particularly well-equipped to overcome these changes. Its economy is exceptional, and this is especially true when it comes to the US workforce.

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A Better Way to Fix Infrastructure

by Daniel Heil featuring the work of Joshua D. Rauh, Lee Ohanian, Tom Churchvia Policy Insights | A Succinct Guide to Important Policy Questions
Wednesday, June 17, 2020

American infrastructure is need of an overhaul. But, as we learned in the last edition of Policy Insights, government-funded projects often fail to live up to their lofty goals. The problem isn’t that dollars aren’t being spent on infrastructure. Instead, it is that the money is being spent poorly.

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