Victor Davis Hanson

Martin and Illie Anderson Senior Fellow
Awards and Honors:
Statesmanship Award from the Claremont Institute
(2006)
Biography: 

Victor Davis Hanson is the Martin and Illie Anderson Senior Fellow at the Hoover Institution; his focus is classics and military history.

Hanson was a National Endowment for the Humanities fellow at the Center for Advanced Studies in the Behavioral Sciences, Stanford, California (1992–93), a visiting professor of classics at Stanford University (1991–92), the annual Wayne and Marcia Buske Distinguished Visiting Fellow in History at Hillsdale College (2004–), the Visiting Shifron Professor of Military History at the US Naval Academy (2002–3),and the William Simon Visiting Professor of Public Policy at Pepperdine University (2010).

In 1991 he was awarded an American Philological Association Excellence in Teaching Award. He received the Eric Breindel Award for Excellence in Opinion Journalism (2002), presented the Manhattan's Institute's Wriston Lecture (2004), and was awarded the National Humanities Medal (2007) and the Bradley Prize (2008).

Hanson is the author of hundreds of articles, book reviews, and newspaper editorials on Greek, agrarian, and military history and essays on contemporary culture. He has written or edited twenty-three books, the latest of which is The Second World Wars (Basic Books), which was released in October 2017. His other books include The Savior Generals: How Five Great Commanders Saved Wars That Were Lost - from Ancient Greece to Iraq (Bloomsbury 2013); The End of Sparta (Bloomsbury, 2011); The Father of Us All: War and History, Ancient and Modern (Bloomsbury, 2010); Makers of Ancient Strategy: From the Persian Wars to the Fall of Rome (ed.) (Princeton, 2010); The Other Greeks (California, 1998); The Soul of Battle (Free Press, 1999); Carnage and Culture (Doubleday, 2001); Ripples of Battle (Doubleday, 2003); A War Like No Other (Random House, 2005); The Western Way of War (Alfred Knopf, 1989; 2nd paperback ed., University of California Press, 2000); The Wars of the Ancient Greeks (Cassell, 1999; paperback ed., 2001); and Mexifornia: A State of Becoming (Encounter, 2003), as well as two books on family farming, Fields without Dreams (Free Press, 1995) and The Land Was Everything (Free Press, 1998). Currently, he is a syndicated columnist for Tribune Media Services and a weekly columnist for the National Review Online.

Hanson received a BA in classics at the University of California, Santa Cruz (1975), was a fellow at the American School of Classical Studies, Athens (1977–78), and received his PhD in classics from Stanford University (1980).

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Recent Commentary

Immigration Reform
Featured CommentaryFeatured

California, The Rhetoric Of Illegal Immigration, And The Perils Of Ignoring Thucydides’s Warning

by Victor Davis Hansonvia Eureka
Tuesday, November 7, 2017

Vocabulary changes always reflect the agendas of a political debate. The fight over illegal immigration plays out by altering words and their meanings. Take the traditional rubric “illegal alien.” The English has been clear and exact for nearly a century: illegal alien (cf. Latin alienus) was a descriptive term for any foreigner who crossed the US border without coming through customs to obtain proper legal sanction.

Featured

Don't Forget Middle East Madness

by Victor Davis Hansonvia National Review
Tuesday, November 7, 2017

Thanks to the Iran deal, the mullahs can buy nearly all the weapons they need. There is currently a real Asian pivot as the president completes one of the longest presidential tours of Asia in memory. Three carrier battle groups are in the West Pacific. 

Featured

Whatever Doesn't Kill Trump Only Makes Him Stronger

by Victor Davis Hansonvia Los Angeles Times
Sunday, November 5, 2017

Donald Trump presides as he campaigned. He is proving a Nietzschean figure in the sense that “what does not kill him makes him stronger.”

Featured

Who Gets to Have Nuclear Weapons And Why?

by Victor Davis Hansonvia National Review
Thursday, November 2, 2017

Given North Korea's nuclear lunacy, what exactly are the rules, formal or implicit, about which nations can have nuclear weapons and which cannot? It is complicated.

Featured

NATO For The 21st Century: Ensuring Liberal Democracy In Europe

by Victor Davis Hansonvia PolicyEd.org
Thursday, November 2, 2017

NATO was originally founded after World War II to ensure that liberal democracy survived in Europe. While the fall of the Soviet Union may have led many to question whether NATO was still necessary, its mission remains vital and relevant. NATO should resist the temptation to expand its geographic focus.

The Advantages Of Liberal Insurance

by Victor Davis Hanson
Tuesday, October 31, 2017

Pay up now, via public support for progressive causes, to avoid punishment later.

Featured

The Islamic State And The Limitations Of Cruelty

by Victor Davis Hansonvia National Review
Thursday, October 26, 2017

The fate of ISIS reminds us that those who pose as superhuman savages often cannot stand up to payback by their outraged victims.

Featured

The ‘Never Trump’ Construct

by Victor Davis Hansonvia National Review
Tuesday, October 24, 2017

The president’s fiercest critics still do not grasp that Trump is a symptom, not the cause of the GOP’s internal strife. 

Analysis and Commentary

North Korea Knowns And Unknowns

by Victor Davis Hansonvia National Review
Thursday, October 19, 2017

No one really knows all that much about North Korea's nuclear or conventional military capability or its strategic agenda. Are its nuclear missiles reliably lethal, are they as long-ranged and accurate as hyped, and are they under secure command and control?

Analysis and Commentary

An Avoidable Great War

by Victor Davis Hansonvia National Review
Thursday, October 19, 2017

Far from being inevitable, World War II resulted from the Allies’ failure to muster their combined resources and power in the service of deterring Hitler.

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