Hoover Daily Report
Analysis and Commentary
Analysis and Commentary

A Return to Keynes?

by Thomas Sowellvia Creators Syndicate
Tuesday, October 15, 2013

Thomas Sowell Opinion Columns - A Return to Keynes?

Analysis and Commentary

A Nobel for the Random Walk of Stock Prices

by David R. Hendersonvia Wall Street Journal
Tuesday, October 15, 2013

Sometimes the Nobel committee seems to make a partly political statement in choosing winners of the prize in economics. Not this year.

Analysis and Commentary

America Is Intervened Out

by Victor Davis Hansonvia National Review Online
Tuesday, October 15, 2013

Our security interests have changed, along with our sense that we can make a difference.

Analysis and Commentary

What Are They Fighting Over?

by Victor Davis Hansonvia Corner (National Review Online)
Monday, October 14, 2013

The deficit this year may fall to below $700 billion, but that is still huge at a time of a record near $17 trillion in debt, and comes despite a supposedly recovering economy and more revenue, despite recent sequestration cuts, despite dramatic gains in U.S. domestic energy production, despite the return of the Clinton-era tax hikes to the top brackets, and despite the end of the war in Iraq and the wind down in Afghanistan.  Wars, tax cuts on the wealthy, and out-of-control defense spending were all in the past variously cited as causing these huge deficits. In fact, the more compelling causes were always chronically slow economic growth, out-of-control federal spending, and the exemption of nearly half of America from paying any income tax at all.  No wonder we have a deadlock, when the best medicine for restoring fiscal health—stronger GDP growth through suspending Obamacare, opening up federal gas and oil leasing, cutting back on new regulations, and reforming the tax code—is apparently seen as worse than the disease of huge annual deficits.  So we will continue to fight over redistributing a shrinking pie, in hopes that now institutionalized near-zero interest rates will keep allowing us to service a rising debt that otherwise would have crushed us long ago. The winners at the top in all this are Wall Street that does not have to do much, as hundreds of billions of dollars flock to it in search of any return at all, and, at the bottom of the pyramid, those receiving increased entitlements and federal assistance who pay no income taxes—while the bigger losers are most everyone else in between, struggling with steep gas, food, and power costs, but especially the vanishing upper-middle, job-creating, entrepreneurial classes who are paying more taxes, receiving no returns on their savings accounts, and facing ever more federal fees and regulations.  No wonder a pyramidal U.S. is beginning to look like a chic Palo Alto or Upper West Side elite atop a romanticized and avoided underclass, with a shrinking and caricatured class in-between.

Analysis and Commentary

Let’s Give Out Our Own Nobel Prize

by Fouad Ajamivia Bloomberg View
Monday, October 14, 2013

The picture on the front page of Saturday’s New York Times was worth a thousand words. Young Pakistani girls, one of them clutching a notebook, were awaiting

Analysis and Commentary

First Ladies: Influence and Image Lou Hoover

with Lou Henry Hoovervia C-SPAN
Monday, October 14, 2013
Interviews
Interviews

Bill Whalen on The John Batchelor Show (2:27)

with Bill Whalenvia John Batchelor Show
Monday, October 14, 2013

Guests: Bill Whalen, Hoover & Sacramento Bee.  Jeff Bliss, The Bliss Index.  Gene Countryman, KNSS Wichita. : Charles Blahous, Hoover, Mercatus Center and Real Clear Markets.

Interviews

Chuck Blahous on The John Batchelor Show (20:31)

with Charles Blahousvia John Batchelor Show
Monday, October 14, 2013

Guests: Bill Whalen, Hoover & Sacramento Bee.  Jeff Bliss, The Bliss Index.  Gene Countryman, KNSS Wichita. : Charles Blahous, Hoover, Mercatus Center and Real Clear Markets.

In the News
In the News

Laurene Powell Jobs Has Hill's Attention

with Bill Whalenvia Politico
Tuesday, October 15, 2013

SAN FRANCISCO — Two years after the death of Apple co-founder Steve Jobs, his widow, Laurene Powell Jobs, is stepping more visibly onto the national political stage — and generating buzz in Washington, D.C., about her future. After dropping in on lawmakers late last year, Jobs has become a regular visitor to Capitol Hill to press for immigration...

In the News

Chastening the Giant Banks

with Kevin Warshvia New York Times
Monday, October 14, 2013

Banks have lost some of their swagger, but they're back in fighting form. Will they always be too big to fail?