Military History/Contemporary Conflict Working Group

Role of Military History in Contemporary Conflict

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War Plane
Analysis and Commentary

War Was Interested In Obama

by Victor Davis Hansonvia Works and Days
Sunday, June 15, 2014

Leon Trotsky probably did not quite write the legendary aphorism that “you may not be interested in war, but war is interested in you.” But whoever did, you get the point that no nation can always pick and choose when it wishes to be left alone.

World Puzzle
Analysis and Commentary

Our Bad Habit of Negotiating with Terrorists

by Bruce Thorntonvia FrontPage Mag.com
Monday, June 2, 2014

Every parent should be happy for the Bergdahl family, whose son was returned to them after five years of captivity among the Taliban. But every parent is not the president of the United States, whose primary responsibility is to protect the security and interests of all Americans, both now and in the long-term.

an image
Analysis and Commentary

Obama’s Audiences

by Angelo M. Codevillavia LIbrary of Law and Liberty
Sunday, June 1, 2014

West Point’s graduating cadets were patriotic props for President Obama’s “major speech” on foreign policy. Heavy advertisement of the speech, pre and post, tells us that others were his intended audience. The speech was a defense of his conduct of foreign policy against critics whom he did not name but characterized gratuitously, together with a promise to double down on that conduct in the future.

D-Day Helmet
Analysis and Commentary

What Was D-Day?

by Victor Davis Hansonvia Tribune Media Services
Wednesday, May 28, 2014

Seventy years ago this June 6, the Americans, British and Canadians stormed the beaches of Normandy in the largest amphibious invasion of Europe since the Persian king Xerxes invaded Greece in 480 B.C.

The White House
Analysis and Commentary

The Root of the Discretion to Kill

by Angelo M. Codevillavia Library of Law and Liberty
Monday, May 26, 2014

President Obama announced a few days ago that he will release some parts of the secret memorandum by which the U.S. government authorizes itself to kill whichever U.S. citizens it deems terrorist enemies. 

Blue Globe showing US
Interviews

Angelo Codevilla on Opinion Journal

interview with Angelo M. Codevillavia Wall Street Journal Live
Tuesday, May 20, 2014

Angelo Codevilla discusses US foreign policy on Wall Street Journal Live.

Analysis and Commentary

Discredited in Benghazi

by Angelo M. Codevillavia Library of Law and Liberty
Monday, May 19, 2014
Analysis and Commentary

America: Founded For Peace

by Angelo M. Codevillavia Defining Ideas (Hoover Institution)
Wednesday, May 7, 2014
Jerusalem
Analysis and Commentary

Neglected Prophet: J.B. Kelly

by Bruce Thorntonvia FrontPage Mag.com
Monday, May 5, 2014
Books

To Make and Keep Peace Among Ourselves and with All Nations

by Angelo M. Codevillavia Hoover Institution Press
Thursday, May 1, 2014

Angelo Codevilla asks, What does it mean for the United States to be at peace? How is it to be won and preserved in our time? Noting that our government’s increasingly unlimited powers flow in part from our statesmen’s inability to stay out of wars or win them and that our statesmen and academics have ceased to think about such thing. the purpose of this book is to rekindle such thoughts.

Pages

Chair
Martin and Illie Anderson Senior Fellow
Member
Payson J. Treat Distinguished Research Fellow in Contemporary Asia
Research Fellow
Tad and Dianne Taube Senior Fellow
Senior Fellow
Annenberg Distinguished Visiting Fellow
Milbank Family Senior Fellow
Distinguished Visiting Fellow
Fouad and Michelle Ajami Senior Fellow
Senior Fellow
Roger and Martha Mertz Visiting Fellow
Robert and Marion Oster Distinguished Military Fellow
W. Glenn Campbell Research Fellow
Research Fellow
Contributor
Research Fellow / National Security Affairs Fellow 2008-2009

The Working Group on the Role of Military History in Contemporary Conflict examines how knowledge of past military operations can influence contemporary public policy decisions concerning current conflicts. 


As the very name of Hoover Institution attests, military history lies at the very core of our dedication to the study of "War, Revolution, and Peace." Indeed, the precise mission statement of the Hoover Institution includes the following promise: "The overall mission of this Institution is, from its records, to recall the voice of experience against the making of war, and by the study of these records and their publication, to recall man's endeavors to make and preserve peace, and to sustain for America the safeguards of the American way of life." From its origins as a library and archive, the Hoover Institution has evolved into one of the foremost research centers in the world for policy formation and pragmatic analysis. It is with this tradition in mind, that the "Working Group on the Role of Military History in Contemporary Conflict" has set its agenda—reaffirming the Hoover Institution's dedication to historical research in light of contemporary challenges, and in particular, reinvigorating the national study of military history as an asset to foster and enhance our national security. By bringing together a diverse group of distinguished military historians, security analysts, and military veterans and practitioners, the working group seeks to examine the conflicts of the past as critical lessons for the present.

Victor Davis Hanson on War in the Contemporary World — WATCH

The careful study of military history offers a way of analyzing modern war and peace that is often underappreciated in this age of technological determinism. Yet the result leads to a more in-depth and dispassionate understanding of contemporary wars, one that explains how particular military successes and failures of the past can be often germane, sometimes misunderstood, or occasionally irrelevant in the context of the present.

The working group is chaired by Victor Davis Hanson with counsel from Bruce S. Thornton and David L. Berkey, along with collaboration form the group’s distinguished scholars, military historians, analysts, journalists, and military officers.