Business & Labor

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by Michael Spencevia Project Syndicate
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interview with Stephen Habervia Wall Street Journal Live
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by Lee Ohanian, Edward Prescottvia Wall Street Journal

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The StateAnalysis and Commentary

When It Comes To Playing “the California Game,” Kevin Durant May Have Dethroned “King James”

by Bill Whalenvia California on Your Mind
Thursday, April 18, 2019

If you’re a fan of the National Basketball Association, you’re probably aware of two California trends.

Featured

An Equation To Ensure America Survives The Age Of AI

by Elizabeth Cobbsvia Financial Times
Thursday, April 11, 2019

Tech investors celebrate a future of self-driving taxis and low labour costs as gig economy platform companies such as Lyft and Uber go public. But workers spy disaster. In more and more industries, the low-skilled suffer declining pay and hours. McKinsey estimates that 60 per cent of occupations are at risk of partial or total automation.

In the News

Raghuram Rajan Has A Few Tips On Jobs, Reforms For The Next Govt

quoting Raghuram Rajanvia Business Today
Wednesday, April 10, 2019

Former RBI Governor Raghuram Rajan suggested that India needs to boost its pace of growth, especially in job creating sectors which in turn merits a whole new generation of reforms as the old ones have lost momentum.

Friedman FundamentalsFeatured

What Drives Economic Progress

by Milton Friedmanvia PolicyEd
Wednesday, April 10, 2019

The world thrives when individuals are able to pursue their interests without government interference.

Analysis and Commentary

The Minimum Wage As A Perpetual Motion Machine

by David R. Hendersonvia EconLog
Tuesday, April 9, 2019

Jubal Harshaw at the blog GrokInFullness had an excellent post last month on the minimum wage that I had missed.

Analysis and Commentary

The Indigenous Peoples War Against Pipelines

by Richard A. Epsteinvia Forbes
Monday, April 8, 2019

The world will continue to to rely on fossil fuels for most of its energy needs. 

In the News

Young Businesses Are More Vulnerable To Housing Market Shocks

featuring Steven J. Davisvia Chicago Booth Review
Thursday, April 4, 2019

The US housing market bust after 2006 drove a historic collapse in the employment share of young companies, according to research by Chicago Booth’s Steven J. Davis and University of Maryland’s John Haltiwanger. The share of private-sector workers employed by young companies (defined as less than 60 months old) dropped from 18 percent in 1987 to just 9 percent in 2014. It fell especially fast from 2006 to 2011.

Analysis and Commentary

Hidden Costs Of The Minimum Wage

by David R. Hendersonvia EconLog
Saturday, April 6, 2019

Jonathan Meer, an economics professor and first-rate economic researcher at Texas A&M University, shared with me an op/ed on the minimum wage that he wrote recently. It was rejected by a few publications, although I think, as you’ll see, the rejection had nothing to do with the quality of the piece. So he and I have agreed that I’ll run it here as a guest blog post.

Amazing Progress On Unemployment Claims

by David R. Henderson
Friday, April 5, 2019

An amazing statistic came out earlier this week, one that CNBC remarked on but still, in my view got too little attention. Here’s the report from CNBC: The number of Americans filing applications for unemployment benefits dropped to a more than 49-year low last week, pointing to sustained labor market strength despite slowing economic growth.

Analysis and Commentary

Are Career-Tech Students Preparing For Jobs That Actually Exist?

by Amber M. Northern, Michael J. Petrillivia Thomas B. Fordham Institute
Wednesday, April 3, 2019

Not long ago, the New York Times ran a revealing article titled “The Typical American Lives Only 18 Miles From Mom.” Based on a comprehensive survey of older Americans, the authors reported that, “Over the last few decades, Americans have become less mobile, and most adults—especially those with less education or lower incomes—do not venture far from their hometowns.” In fact, “the median distance Americans live from their mother is eighteen miles, and only 20 percent live more than a couple of hours’ drive from their parents.”

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Economic Policy Working Group

 
The Working Group on Economic Policy brings together experts on economic and financial policy to study key developments in the U.S. and global economies, examine their interactions, and develop specific policy proposals.

Milton and Rose Friedman: An Uncommon Couple