Stephen Kotkin

Senior Fellow / National Fellow 2010–11
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Biography: 

Stephen Kotkin, in addition to being a Hoover senior fellow, is the Birkelund Professor of History and International Affairs in the Woodrow Wilson School and History Department of Princeton University, where he has taught since 1989.  He received his PhD at UC Berkeley during the years Reagan was president.  He has been conducting research in the Hoover Library and Archives for three decades.  He founded and runs Princeton’s Global History Initiative.

Kotkin’s research encompasses geopolitics and authoritarian regimes in history and in the present.  His publications include Stalin, Vol. I: Paradoxes of Power, 1878-1928 (Penguin, November 2014), part of a three-volume history of Russian power in the world and of Stalin’s power in Russia. The first volume has been called "superb" (Wall Street Journal); "riveting" (New York Times); "magisterial" (American Scholar); "masterful" (Literary Review); "near definitive" (New Yorker);  "exceptionally ambitious" (Atlantic); "exciting" (Reason); and "judicious" (First Things).  He has also written a history of the Stalin system’s rise from an in-depth street-level perspective, Magnetic Mountain: Stalinism as a Civilization (University of California, 1995). With the Berlin Wall collapsing two months into his first course at Princeton, Kotkin has written a trilogy analyzing communism’s demise.  Two volumes have appeared thus far: Armageddon Averted: The Soviet Collapse 1970–2000 (Oxford, 2001; revised edition 2008) and Uncivil Society: 1989 and the Implosion of the Communist Establishment, with a contribution by Jan T. Gross (Modern Library, 2009).  A third, on the Soviet Union in the third world and Afghanistan, is in manuscript.

Although he has never served in government, Kotkin has participated in numerous National Intelligence Council events over the years.  He served as the lead book reviewer for the New York Times Sunday Business Section (2006–9), and has published a large number of reviews and essays in the New Republic, Foreign Affairs, Financial Times, Times Literary Supplement, and New Yorker, among other venues.  He has been a Hoover National Fellow, an American Council of Learned Societies Fellow, a National Endowment for the Humanities Fellow, and a Guggenheim Fellow.

 

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Recent Commentary

Autocrat For Life

by Stephen Kotkinvia Hoover Digest
Friday, June 19, 2015

Vladimir Putin, with his genius for tapping the country’s pathologies, has come to embody Russia itself.

In the News

The 12 People Who Ruined Ukraine

by Stephen Kotkinvia Politico
Wednesday, May 27, 2015

When Russian President Vladimir Putin sat down to plot his invasion of Ukraine in February 2014, he didn’t have to start from scratch. Generations of Russian rulers have invaded Ukrainian lands to starve, deport and enslave the native populations, and Putin has drawn avidly from their playbooks. Ukraine’s oligarchs have been equally ruthless in despoiling the country, some even funding the very rebels who’d like to conquer it. Here’s a rundown of those who have done the most to devastate Ukraine.

In the News

Stalin’s Man In Spain

by Stephen Kotkinvia Wall Street Journal
Tuesday, March 24, 2015

‘Between a Communist and a traitor there can be no relations of any kind,’ Carrillo told his father, a Socialist party member, in 1939.

Analysis and Commentary

The Resistible Rise Of Vladimir Putin

by Stephen Kotkinvia Foreign Affairs
Tuesday, February 24, 2015

How did twenty-first-century Russia end up, yet again, in personal rule? An advanced industrial country of 142 million people, it has no enduring political parties that organize and respond to voter preferences.

Stalin: Volume I: Paradoxes of Power, 1878-1928

Stalin: Volume I: Paradoxes of Power, 1878-1928

by Stephen Kotkinvia Penguin Press
Thursday, November 6, 2014

A magnificent new biography that revolutionizes our understanding of Stalin and his world.

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