Technology, Economics, and Governance Working Group

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Chair
George P. Shultz Senior Fellow in Economics
Morris Arnold and Nona Jean Cox Senior Fellow

Technology, Economics, And Governance News Roundup | November 12 - 19

Friday, November 19, 2021

A weekly digest of the latest news and research related to the work of the Technology, Economics, and Governance Working Group. Topics covered in the digest include cybersecurity, domestic regulation, innovation, international competition, social media disinformation, and the California exodus.

This week’s edition of the news roundup highlights two articles that illuminate the complexities of social media governance on the international stage and in U.S. courtrooms. Additional topics include the operationalization of ethical AI principles, investment challenges for rural founders, and protection of critical infrastructure from cybersecurity threats.

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Technology, Economics, And Governance News Roundup | November 5 - 12

Friday, November 12, 2021

A weekly digest of the latest news and research related to the work of the Technology, Economics, and Governance Working Group. Topics covered in the digest include cybersecurity, domestic regulation, innovation, international competition, social media disinformation, and the California exodus.

This week’s edition of the news roundup includes a piece on the difficulty that U.S. spies are having gathering intelligence in China, new research from Brookings on the use of artificial intelligence on the battlefield, and a warning about the presence of cyber vulnerabilities in space satellites.

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Technology, Economics, And Governance News Roundup | October 29 - Nov. 5

Friday, November 5, 2021

A weekly digest of the latest news and research related to the work of the Technology, Economics, and Governance Working Group. Topics covered in the digest include cybersecurity, domestic regulation, innovation, international competition, social media disinformation, and the California exodus.

This week’s roundup includes a piece with a variety of perspectives on how to regulate social media, the latest on China’s trade strategy, and an op-ed on why proposed federal regulation of tech companies could inhibit innovation.

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Technology, Economics, And Governance News Roundup | October 22 - 29

Friday, October 29, 2021

A weekly digest of the latest news and research related to the work of the Technology, Economics, and Governance Working Group. Topics covered in the digest include cybersecurity, domestic regulation, innovation, international competition, social media disinformation, and the California exodus.

This week’s roundup includes the announcement of a new cyber bureau within the State Department, NATO’s new artificial intelligence strategy, and a warning that careless regulatory policy aimed at U.S. tech giants could give China a technological leg up.  

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Technology, Economics, And Governance News Roundup | October 15 - 22

Friday, October 22, 2021

A weekly digest of the latest news and research related to the work of the Technology, Economics, and Governance Working Group. Topics covered in the digest include cybersecurity, domestic regulation, innovation, international competition, social media disinformation, and the California exodus.

This week’s edition includes new research on the economic impact of proposed anti-trust regulation targeting big tech, the latest on how bad actors are using cryptocurrencies to evade sanctions, and two pieces on the debate around free expression online.

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Featured

A Conversation With Nick Clegg On Global Regulation, Internet Governance, And Oversight | Technology, Economics, And Governance Working Group

Tuesday, October 19, 2021

Sir Nick Clegg joined Facebook in October 2018 as Vice President of Global Affairs and Communications after almost two decades in British and European public life. Prior to being elected to the UK Parliament in 2005 he worked in the European Commission and served for five years as a Member of the European Parliament. He became leader of the Liberal Democrat party in 2007 and served as Deputy Prime Minister in the UK’s first Coalition Government since the war from 2010 to 2015. He has written two best-selling books: Politics: Between the Extremes and How To Stop Brexit (and make Britain great again)

Event

Technology, Economics, And Governance News Roundup | October 8 - 15

Friday, October 15, 2021

A weekly digest of the latest news and research related to the work of the Technology, Economics, and Governance Working Group. Topics covered in the digest include cybersecurity, domestic regulation, innovation, international competition, social media disinformation, and the California exodus.

This week’s roundup includes an argument about why defining the AI race with China as a zero-sum contest could be dangerous, the details on a scary new type of cyberthreat, and new data on the desire of Bay Area residents and tech companies to leave the state.

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Technology, Economics, And Governance News Roundup | October 1 - 8

Friday, October 8, 2021

A weekly digest of the latest news and research related to the work of the Technology, Economics, and Governance Working Group. Topics covered in the digest include cybersecurity, domestic regulation, innovation, international competition, social media disinformation, and the California exodus.

This week’s edition examines the latest from the Facebook Senate hearings, America’s efforts to take on Huawei, and Tesla HQ’s move from California to Texas.

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Technology, Economics, And Governance News Roundup | Sept. 24 - October 1

Friday, October 1, 2021

A weekly digest of the latest news and research related to the work of the Technology, Economics, and Governance Working Group. Topics covered in the digest include cybersecurity, domestic regulation, innovation, international competition, social media disinformation, and the California exodus.

This week’s edition includes pieces on why Florida may be the new Silicon Valley, Facebook’s showdown with the Senate, and a report from RAND on how to address the challenges of building an offensive and defensive cyber workforce in the U.S. Armed Forces.

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Technology, Economics, and Governance News Roundup | September 17 - 24, 2021

Friday, September 24, 2021

A weekly digest of the latest news and research related to the work of the Technology, Economics, and Governance Working Group. Topics covered in the digest include cybersecurity, domestic regulation, innovation, international competition, social media disinformation, and the California exodus.

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The Technology, Economics, and Governance Working Group seeks to understand the drivers and dynamics of technological innovation in the 21st century, assess the opportunities and risks that breakthrough technologies are creating, and develop governance approaches that maximize the benefits and mitigate the risks for the nation and the world. Facts and objective analysis are the keys to the approach.


As described in more detail in this statement of purpose, the Working Group conducts original research, brings together private sector and public sector leaders, and develops policy recommendations for decision-makers at all levels of government.

New technologies—from Internet advances to artificial intelligence to synthetic biology and many more—are transforming the global economy and connecting us in ways unimaginable only a few years ago. Emerging technologies are offering unmatched opportunities to alleviate poverty, raise economic growth, treat disease, and improve lives all over the world. But these technologies are also fueling new geopolitical competition and they are posing unprecedented governance challenges to domestic political institutions.

Policymakers today are grappling with a host of difficult questions. Congressional proposals are increasingly calling for ways to reduce the power of large tech firms, from breaking them up to regulating them or taxing them. Yet it is not evident that any of these solutions will solve the problems the nation confronts with emerging technologies, and many of these approaches could hurt the nation by hobbling American innovation. Is the problem monopoly power, which leads to higher prices, or is it the power to exclude certain individuals or firms from using the platforms? How would break-ups take place, and would they depend on the market and the product? Are there better ways to proceed that do not throw out the scale advantages and greater global interconnectedness?