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IntellectionsFeatured

Nuclear Power: The Clean Energy Everyone Overlooks

by Admiral James O. Ellis Jr.via PolicyEd
Monday, March 25, 2019

As the world continues to shift toward low-carbon energy sources, a closer look makes it clear that nuclear power has to be included in order to reduce carbon emissions. Until the problem of long-term power storage is solved, nuclear will remain the only zero carbon base load power source. Given how clean and reliable it is compared to its alternatives, it is far too early to take nuclear power off the table.

In the News

Trump's Top Economic Adviser Still Supports Carbon Tax

quoting Casey B. Mulliganvia E&E News
Wednesday, March 20, 2019
President Trump's top economic adviser is not backing away from his belief that a carbon tax would be an effective way to address greenhouse gas emissions.
Blank Section (Placeholder)Analysis and Commentary

Area 45: The Trillion-Dollar Storm With Alice Hill

interview with Alice Hillvia Area 45
Monday, March 25, 2019

How can the US plan for and build resilience for catastrophic natural disasters?

Centennial SecretsFeatured

The History Of Nuclear Warfare And The Future Of Nuclear Energy

via The Hoover Centennial
Friday, March 15, 2019

The first atomic strike in 1945 changed the world forever.

Uncommon Knowledge new logo 1400 x 1400
Blank Section (Placeholder)

Cost-Effective Approaches to Save the Environment, with Bjorn Lomborg

interview with Bjorn Lomborgvia Uncommon Knowledge
Monday, March 4, 2019

AUDIO ONLY

Bjorn Lomborg breaks down the costs of current proposed policies to relieve climate change and proposes cost-effective and economically feasible alternative solutions.

Carbon Tax and Carbon Dividend To Combat Global Climate Change

by Alvin Rabushka
Friday, February 22, 2019

Thirty-four hundred economists and counting, including 4 former chairs of the Federal Reserve, 27 Nobel Laureates, 15 former chairs of the Council of Economic Advisers, and 2 former secretaries of the treasury, have signed a statement proposing a carbon tax to combat global climate change.

Featured

Statement Backing Hoover Fellow And Stanford Professor’s Carbon Tax Proposal Garners Record-Setting Support From Economists

featuring George P. Shultzvia Stanford Daily
Wednesday, February 20, 2019

A record-setting 3,333 economists, including 32 at Stanford, have signed a statement supporting a carbon tax proposal co-authored by Stanford Professor Emeritus and former Secretary of State George Shultz, the nonprofit Climate Leadership Council announced on Monday. The proposal would levy a tax on the production and use of carbon emissions that increases over time but remains revenue neutral; collected money would be returned to U.S. citizens in equal payments, so the government would spend none of the money.

Analysis and Commentary

David Davenport: The Green New Deal Looks Red To Me

by David Davenportvia Townhall Review
Thursday, February 14, 2019

Perhaps you’ve heard about the Green New Deal?  It’s freshman Congresswoman Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez’s revolutionary scheme to reinvent the entire American economy.  She calls it “the Great Society, the moonshot, the civil rights movement of our generation.”

Blueprint for AmericaFeatured

Redefining Energy Security: Blueprint For America

by Admiral James O. Ellis Jr.via PolicyEd
Tuesday, January 22, 2019

The United States is close to achieving energy independence for the first time in decades, but it should go further to achieve energy security.

In the News

ConocoPhillips Backs Carbon Tax Plan

mentioning George P. Shultzvia The Hill
Monday, December 17, 2018
Oil and natural gas giant ConocoPhillips Co. is backing an effort to impose a tax on carbon dioxide emissions.

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Energy Policy Task Force


The Task Force on Energy Policy addresses energy policy in the United States and its effects on our domestic and international political priorities, particularly our national security.