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Centennial SecretsFeatured

The History Of Nuclear Warfare And The Future Of Nuclear Energy

via The Hoover Centennial
Friday, March 15, 2019

The first atomic strike in 1945 changed the world forever.

Interviews

What Began as a Very Positive Image-Boosting Initiative: Talking to Elizabeth C. Economy

interview with Elizabeth Economyvia Los Angeles Review of Books
Friday, March 8, 2019

Hoover Institution fellow Elizabeth Economy discusses how China has fared on reaching its own official goals (for instance in terms of economic growth, governmental accountability, military power), as well as her new book The Third Revolution: Xi Jinping and the New Chinese State.

Policy Seminar with Gary Roughead, Mike McCord, and Roger Zakheim

Wednesday, February 27, 2019
Annenberg Conference Room, Lou Henry Hoover Building

Three commissioners of the National Defense Strategy Commission discussed the Commission’s assessment of the current National Defense Strategy.

Event
Featured CommentaryAnalysis and Commentary

China’s Tide Is High, But Is It At High Tide?

by Michael R. Auslinvia Strategika
Thursday, March 28, 2019

If China’s explosive economic growth since the beginning of reform in 1979 is a unique success story, no less impressive has been the concomitant growth of its military and political power, as well as its global influence. Few could have predicted that within one generation of Richard Nixon’s visit to Beijing in 1972, China would vie with the United States for the banner of global leadership. By any measure, China’s efforts to surpass American predominance in the world must be taken seriously, and in some cases, may even seem to have succeeded. 

Background EssayAnalysis and Commentary

China Never Was A Superpower—And It Won’t Be One Anytime Soon

by Gordon G. Changvia Strategika
Thursday, March 28, 2019

“The world by 2049 will be defined by the realization of Chinese power,” write Bradley Thayer and John Friend, referring to the centenary of the founding of the People’s Republic. “China,” these American academics tell us, “will be the world’s greatest economic and political force.” Must Americans accept the inevitability of Chinese dominance of the international system?

Blank Section (Placeholder)Analysis and Commentary

Political Correctness And History: In Defense Of Churchill

by Williamson Murrayvia Military History in the News
Thursday, February 28, 2019

In October of this past year, the astronaut Scott Kelly tweeted a famous quote from Winston Churchill: “in victory, magnanimity.” For his troubles he received a host of outraged tweets from the politically correct crowd that Churchill was a racist, responsible for the 1943 famine in Bengal, and numerous other supposed atrocities as Britain’s leader during the Second World War. The tweets are a remarkable tribute to the widespread ignorance of the past among those who so delightedly cast their fury at the past.

Blank Section (Placeholder)Analysis and Commentary

Preparing For The Future

by Williamson Murrayvia Military History in the News
Tuesday, February 26, 2019

The use of history to think about the present and the future is always difficult for a number of reasons. Perhaps the most important difficulty is that to use it successfully one has to have read deeply and widely in it, and even then, its potential lessons are ambiguous and uncertain. 

Stalin: Volume I: Paradoxes of Power, 1878-1928
In the News

"Stalin: Waiting For Hitler": Talk By Stephen Kotkin

mentioning Stephen Kotkinvia Amherst College
Friday, February 22, 2019
"Stalin: Waiting for Hitler" is a talk by Stephen Kotkin, who is the John P. Birkelund Professor in History and International Affairs at Princeton University. He is also a fellow at the Hoover Institution at Stanford University. He directs Princeton's Institute for International and Regional Studies and co-directs its Program in the History and Practice of Diplomacy.
Blank Section (Placeholder)Analysis and Commentary

On Grand Strategy And China

by Williamson Murrayvia Military History in the News
Friday, February 22, 2019

Whether one talks about grand strategy or military strategy, one must recognize both the crucial importance of means–end analysis, and also of geography. Not surprisingly, given the contempt the German military displayed towards strategic thinking in the two world wars they fought and lost, the Reich’s naval leaders and the Kaiser ignored those two crucial elements in developing the High Seas Fleet in the period before the Second World War.

Blank Section (Placeholder)Analysis and Commentary

On Grand Strategy And Russia

by Williamson Murrayvia Military History in the News
Wednesday, February 20, 2019

Vladimir Putin has proven himself a masterful tactician, who, as all tacticians do, maneuvers in the present with little regard for the future. He has managed to attack Georgia for its arrogance in daring to consider joining NATO, seize the Crimea, cause a nasty struggle in eastern Ukraine, and while destabilizing that state, launch a massive cyberattack on Estonia, assassinate various Russian defectors in the United Kingdom through the use of radioactive materials, and interfere in the 2016 elections in the United States along with other crimes and misdemeanors inflicted on his own people.

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Military History Working Group


The Working Group on the Role of Military History in Contemporary Conflict examines how knowledge of past military operations can influence contemporary public policy decisions concerning current conflicts.