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Blank Section (Placeholder)Featured

A New Afghanistan With H.R. McMaster And Janan Mosazai

interview with H. R. McMaster, Janan Mosazaivia Uncommon Knowledge
Wednesday, November 14, 2018

H.R. McMaster and Janan Mosazai discuss the current state of Afghanistan, it’s position in the Middle East and Asia, and the path forward for the country.

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Fighting To Leave: The Devolution Of The American War Aims In Afghanistan

by Bing West via Military History in the News
Tuesday, November 13, 2018

In early winter of 2001, an invading force of fewer than 10,000 American soldiers, Marines, Special Forces, and CIA operatives stampeded the Taliban and al-Qaeda forces across Afghanistan. A punitive campaign of historic brevity and one-sided casualties was about to end. Then our most senior officials made two disastrous decisions. First, General Tommy Franks, the commander of the invasion, refused to employ American forces to seal off the al-Qaeda remnants, including Osama bin Laden, hiding in the Tora Bora mountains. Instead, General Franks handed the fight over to unreliable Afghan warlords, who let bin Laden and al-Qaeda escape into Afghanistan.

Featured

Goodbye To All That, Again

by Niall Fergusonvia Boston Globe
Monday, November 12, 2018

To my 19-year-old son, World War I — which ended 100 years ago yesterday — is as remote an event as the Congress of Berlin was to me when I was his age. To my generation, World War I was not quite history. My father’s father, John Ferguson, had joined up at the age of 17 and fought on the Western Front as a private in the Seaforth Highlanders. He was one of more than 6 million men from Great Britain who served. Of that number, 722,785 did not come back alive. Just under half of all those who lost their lives were aged between 16 and 24 — a fact that never fails to startle.

Featured

The Legacy Of World War I Includes One Bright Note: Global Humanitarian Aid

featuring Herbert Hoovervia National Review
Sunday, November 11, 2018

Responding to Europe’s plight, Herbert Hoover helped organize and lead an international relief effort on an unprecedented scale.

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U.S. Government Passivity In Cyber Space

by Bing West via Military History in the News
Friday, November 9, 2018

In 2015, President Obama held a press conference with Chinese President Xi Jinping. “I indicated that it [cyber theft] has to stop.” Both governments agreed not to engage in or support online theft of intellectual property.

Featured

The 11th Hour Of The 11th Day Of The 11th Month—100 Years Ago

by Victor Davis Hansonvia American Greatness
Thursday, November 8, 2018

The First World War ended 100 years ago this month on November 11, 1918, at 11 a.m. Nearly 20 million people had perished since the war began on July 28, 1914. In early 1918, it looked as if the Central Powers—Austria-Hungary, Germany, Bulgaria and the Ottoman Empire—would win.

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Area 45: Into The Wild Blue Yonder With Air Force Secretary Heather Wilson

interview with Heather Wilsonvia Area 45
Wednesday, November 7, 2018

How does the Air Force maintain and improve weapons procurement, recruitment, military air superiority, and address the changing role of pilots in 21st Century warfare?

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On the Cover

via Hoover Digest
Monday, October 29, 2018

On November 11, 1918, the guns fell silent on the Western Front, bringing the Great War to a close. This French war-bonds poster from late in the war, with its soldier and ragged banner, hints at the conflict’s gargantuan trail of destruction.

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Revolution Comes to Stanford

by Bertrand M. Patenaudevia Hoover Digest
Monday, October 29, 2018

Remembering Alexander Kerensky: leader of the short-lived Russian Provisional Government that ruled between the czar and the Bolsheviks, he spent his later years at Stanford, hoping for “the resurrection of liberty in my land.”

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Two Roads

by Mark Koyamavia Hoover Digest
Monday, October 29, 2018

Why did Japan and China take such divergent paths into the modern world?

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Military History Working Group


The Working Group on the Role of Military History in Contemporary Conflict examines how knowledge of past military operations can influence contemporary public policy decisions concerning current conflicts.