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No Nukes Is Bad Nukes

by Tom Bethellvia Hoover Digest
Wednesday, April 30, 1997

Despite a growing nuclear threat from Third World countries and terrorist groups, the United States is getting rid of its own nuclear weapons as fast as it can. Hoover media fellow Tom Bethell reports on what amounts to unilateral disarmament.

The Next War (We Could Lose)

by Caspar W. Weinberger, Peter Schweizervia Hoover Digest
Wednesday, April 30, 1997

Engaging in one peacekeeping mission after another, the armed forces of the United States have grown ill-prepared to wage war. An analysis by former Secretary of Defense Caspar W. Weinberger and Hoover visiting fellow Peter Schweizer.

The New American Doctrine

by Christopher L. Shepherdvia Hoover Digest
Wednesday, April 30, 1997

As the brass prepare for the coming Quadrennial Defense Review, "preventive defense" is taking the place of "containment." West Point grad and Hoover national security affairs fellow Lieutenant Colonel Christopher L. Shepherd explains the new doctrine.

Back to the Future

by Edward Teller, Edward Neilan, Peter M. Robinsonvia Hoover Digest
Thursday, January 30, 1997

Hoover fellow Edward Teller became a central figure in President Reagan's effort to develop a defense against ballistic missiles-the Strategic Defense Initiative, or, as it was quickly nicknamed, Star Wars. Recently, some in Congress have once again begun to urge the deployment of a space-based missile defense. Teller is right back in the middle of the controversy.

We present a brief appreciation of Teller by Hoover media fellow Edward Neilan. Then we present an interview with Teller himself, who talks with Hoover fellow Peter Robinson.

At the United Nations, We Should Pay Up and Behave

by Charles Hill, Stephen Stedman, Peter M. Robinsonvia Hoover Digest
Thursday, January 30, 1997

Two experts on the United Nations, Charles Hill, a Hoover fellow, and Stephen Stedman, a professor at the Johns Hopkins School of Advanced International Studies, recently spent an afternoon talking about the relationship between the United Nations and the United States. They argue that the United States has spent the last few years shoving the United Nations around. Hill and Stedman answered questions from Hoover fellow Peter Robinson.

What Crisis?

by Michael McFaulvia Hoover Digest
Thursday, January 30, 1997

With Boris Yeltsin suffering from a bad heart, powerful figures are already plotting to succeed him. Should the West brace itself for a crisis? Relax, says Hoover fellow and Stanford political scientist Michael A. McFaul.

The End of the Evil Empire

by Richard V. Allenvia Hoover Digest
Thursday, January 30, 1997

The cold war did not simply end. It was won. An account by Hoover fellow Richard V. Allen.

When Russians Behave Like Soviets

by Richard F. Staarvia Hoover Digest
Thursday, January 30, 1997

The United States gives Russia billions in aid every year, subject to certain important conditions, including the condition that the Russians demilitarize. The Russians keep on violating the conditions-and we keep on giving them more money. By Hoover fellow Richard F. Staar.

Is the Third Wave Receding?

by Larry Diamondvia Hoover Digest
Thursday, January 30, 1997

The rapid emergence of new democracies during the past two decades is often termed the third wave of democratization. (The first wave took place from the 1820s to the 1920s, the second, from the 1940s to the early 1960s.) Hoover fellow Larry Diamond argues that the third wave is substantially over-and that we must act now to prevent a reverse wave from sweeping the weaker democracies away.

Leave Somalia Alone

via Hoover Digest
Thursday, January 30, 1997

Almost four years after the U.S. mission to Somalia ended in catastrophe, some Americans still feel an urge to lend Somalia a helping hand. Yet as Hoover fellow Robert J. Myers explains, there is only one kind of people who can make a difference in Somalia: Somalis.

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