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Books

Gambling with Other People's Money

by Russell Robertsvia Hoover Institution Press
Monday, February 11, 2019

What caused the Financial Crisis of 2008? Most explanations blame either government regulation or government deregulation. Either government forced private-sector banks and financial institutions to extend credit to risky borrowers, or the removal of government oversight allowed greed to run amok.

Essays

Who Do You Sue?

by Daphne Kellervia Aegis Paper Series
Tuesday, January 29, 2019

This essay closely examines the effect on free-expression rights when platforms such as Facebook or YouTube silence their users’ speech. The first part describes the often messy blend of government and private power behind many content removals, and discusses how the combination undermines users’ rights to challenge state action. The second part explores the legal minefield for users—or potentially, legislators—claiming a right to speak on major platforms. The essay contends that questions of state and private power are deeply intertwined. To understand and protect internet users’ rights, we must understand and engage with both.

Journals

New Issue Of Hoover Digest Online

via Hoover Digest
Friday, January 25, 2019

The winter issue of Hoover Digest is now available online. The journal focuses on topics both classical—the economy, personal freedom, the role of government—and timely, such as cybersecurity, terrorism, and geopolitical shifts. 

Essays

The Important, Justifiable, And Constrained Role Of Nationality In Foreign Intelligence Surveillance

by Peter Swire, Jesse Woo, Deven R. Desaivia Aegis Paper Series
Tuesday, January 8, 2019

This article addresses whether governments ever have a justified basis for treating targets of surveillance differently, in any way, based on nationality. Topics include (1) three ways nationality can matter to surveillance; (2) reasons for stricter rules for law enforcement and domestic collection; (3) reasons for different rules based on the location of collection; (4) the universalist critique of surveillance laws based on nationality; and (5) reasons that can justify stricter surveillance rules based on nationality. Stricter protections are warranted because surveillance of nationals and others with a close connection to the domestic policy poses a special threat to the political opposition and free press of a country, both of which play crucial roles in limiting abuses of state power.

Essays

What Is At Stake In Yemen

by Fahad Nazervia Hoover Institution Press
Thursday, December 20, 2018

Contrary to the prevailing perception that the conflict in Yemen has been forgotten by the international community, the war has garnered a fair amount of attention. However, what is being overlooked is what is at stake in Yemen, how the conflict started, and why it has continued. Instead of focusing exclusively on the Saudi-led coalition’s involvement in the conflict, those seeking to understand the war and the ensuing humanitarian crisis should examine Yemen’s turbulent history, fragile state, the Houthi rebels’ record of militancy, and Iran’s designs to create yet another proxy force in an Arab country. 

Essays

China's Influence & American Interests: Promoting Constructive Vigilance

via Hoover Institution Press
Thursday, November 29, 2018

This report, written and endorsed by a group of this country’s leading China specialists and students of one-party systems is the result of more than a year of research and represents an attempt to document the extent of China’s expanding influence operations inside the United States. While there have been many excellent reports documenting specific examples of Chinese influence seeking, this effort attempts to come to grips with the issue as a whole and features an overview of the Chinese party-state United Front apparatus responsible for guiding overseas influence activities.

Essays

Flat Light

by Andrew Burt, Daniel E. Geer, Jr.via Aegis Paper Series
Tuesday, November 20, 2018

The world of information security has always had reference points – or ground truths – that, like physical features in a landscape, served as navigational features for practitioners and policymakers alike. As time has passed and the state of information security has become more uncertain, these features have eroded. As reference points, they are now either unhelpful (at best) or disinformative (at worst). A deep state of disorientation is now upon us - in privacy, in security, and beyond. This paper explains how we arrived at this point, and suggests what to do next.

Essays

2018 And Beyond

by John P. Carlin, David A. Newmanvia Aegis Paper Series
Monday, November 12, 2018

Despite the assessment that Russia interfered in the 2016 election and will continue this type of activity in the future, there has been little national action. This paper contends that the inaction partially stems from political and bureaucratic obstacles to preparing a US response to any future interference—including obstacles to overcoming public apathy, the concern that any measures taken might favor one political party, and federalism questions that arise whenever the federal government considers proposals affecting state election conduct. 

Journals

New Issue Of Hoover Digest Online

via Hoover Digest
Friday, November 2, 2018

The fall issue of Hoover Digest is now available online. The journal focuses on topics both classical—the economy, personal freedom, the role of government—and timely, such as cybersecurity, terrorism, and geopolitical shifts. 

Essays

Fixing Social Media’s Grand Bargain

by Jack M. Balkinvia Aegis Paper Series
Monday, October 15, 2018

To regulate social media, we should focus on its political economy: the nature of digital capitalism and how we pay for the digital public sphere. This political economy creates perverse incentives for social media companies—encouraging them to surveil, addict, and manipulate their end users and strike deals with third parties who will further manipulate them. Treating social media companies as public forums or public utilities is not the proper cure, but social media companies, whether they like it or not, do have public obligations. This essay focuses on one approach to dealing with the problems of social media: new fiduciary obligations that protect end user privacy and counteract social media companies’ bad incentives.

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Thinking about the Future
By George P. Shultz

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Hoover Institution Press is the publishing arm of the Hoover Institution. Dedicated to informing public policy decisions and communicating key ideas, the press publishes the works of Hoover's fellows, working groups, and affiliated scholars. Concepts that were important to Herbert Hoover—private enterprise, personal freedom, representative government, peace, and safeguarding the American system—continue to animate our work. Areas emphasized are economics, national security, education, energy and the environment, health care, history, law and regulation, and political philosophy.

 

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