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What's Gone Wrong in America's Classrooms

via Hoover Institution Press
Wednesday, July 15, 1998

These essays identify key failures in modern American education and illuminate some ways in which those in the teaching profession—and their students—can achieve higher levels of performance, making the case for content-rich education and explicit teaching.

Fixing Russia's Banks:A Proposal for Growth

Fixing Russia's Banks: A Proposal for Growth

by Michael S. Bernstam, Alvin Rabushkavia Hoover Institution Press
Monday, July 6, 1998

Failing to fix Russia's banks risks further economic stagnation or decline and financial catastrophe.

Status, Power, and Legitimacy

Status, Power, and Legitimacy

by Joseph Bergervia Transaction Publishers
Wednesday, December 31, 1997

Status, Power, and Legitimacy presents methodological, theoretical, and empirical essays by Joseph Berger and Morris Zelditch, Jr.—two of the leading contributors to the Stanford tradition in the study of micropro-cesses.

The Debate in the United States over Immigration

via Hoover Institution Press
Friday, December 5, 1997

These essays examine economic, political, social, and legal issues related to immigration into the United States—from compelling arguments for limited immigration to forceful arguments for open borders. They assess the benefits and costs of immigration and its impact on education, social welfare, and health care.

Reflections on Europe

via Hoover Institution Press
Tuesday, September 30, 1997

These reflections on interrelated issues of concern to Europe and America by five distinguished authors from England, France, Germany, and the United States address complex questions in a post—cold war world.

The New Federalism: Can the States Be Trusted?

via Hoover Institution Press
Tuesday, July 29, 1997

The New Federalism investigates whether returning a variety of regulatory and police powers back to the states will yield better government. It poses the provocative question, Can the states be trusted? and emerges with a qualified yes. This book should be an invaluable resource to federal and state policymakers alike.

Facing the Age Wave

by David A. Wisevia Hoover Institution Press
Monday, July 14, 1997

In Facing the Age Wave, four experts explain the most significant areas of concern created by the aging of the American population and offer possible solutions. From a symposium of distinguished scholars on the subject of aging in America.

How Nations Grow Rich: The Case for Free Trade

by Melvyn B. Kraussvia Oxford University Press
Thursday, May 8, 1997

There can be no doubt, writes economist Melvyn Krauss, that the prosperity of the industrial nations since the Second World War has been due largely to global specialization and interdependence.

Breaking the Environmental Policy Gridlock

via Hoover Institution Press
Friday, January 24, 1997

Can we get Congress to stop the gridlock on our environmental policies?

The Wealth of Nations in the Twentieth Century: The Policies and Institutional Determinants of Economic Development

via Hoover Institution Press
Tuesday, November 26, 1996

This collection of essays, based on a conference at the Hoover Institution, compares the governmental policies and institutional determinants of economic development for sixteen countries within the context of Western economic development and national trends in the world economy. The study also includes an essay by Amartya Sen that examines the meaning of wealth and its different measurements.

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Featured Book

Thinking about the Future
By George P. Shultz

The depth of Hoover’s scholarship is reflected in the numerous books published by our fellows on a broad variety of topics and issues. This timely and prodigious output offers insight on the most pressing issues in public policy.