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The Provinces

After Hu, Who?—China's Provincial Leaders Await Promotion

by Cheng Livia China Leadership Monitor
Wednesday, January 30, 2002

China's provincial leadership is both a training ground for national leadership and a battleground among various political forces. Provincial chiefs currently carry much more weight than ever before in the history of the PRC. This is largely because the criteria for national leadership have shifted from revolutionary credentials such as participation in the Long March to administrative skills such as coalition-building. In addition, provincial governments now have more autonomy in advancing their own regional interests. Nonetheless, nepotism and considerations of factional politics are still evident in the recruitment of provincial leaders. Emerging top-level national leaders—including Hu Jintao, Zeng Qinghong, and Wen Jiabao—have all drawn on the pool of provincial leaders in building their factions, hoping to occupy more seats on the upcoming Sixteenth Central Committee and the Politburo. At the same time, new institutional mechanisms have been adopted to curtail various forms of nepotism. The unfolding of these contradictory trends will not only determine who will rule China after 2002, but even more importantly, how this most populous country in the world will be governed.

Economic Policy

Zhu Rongji: The Twilight of a Brilliant Career

by Barry Naughtonvia China Leadership Monitor
Wednesday, January 30, 2002

Beijing is displaying signs of Zhu Rongji fatigue. Due both to his impending retirement, and to the particularities of his vision of the economic reform process, Zhu's economic policy prescriptions are not as vital or indispensable as before. However, Zhu's legacy of accomplishment is secure. More immediately, Zhu has been preparing the ground for his all-but-designated successor, Wen Jiabao. A smooth transfer of power to Wen will add to Zhu's already formidable reputation as one of the architects of post-Deng China.

Is Assassination an Option?

by Bruce Berkowitzvia Hoover Digest
Wednesday, January 30, 2002

Is assassination a legitimate tool of American foreign policy? If so, under what circumstances? By Hoover fellow Bruce Berkowitz.

The “Blowback” Myth : How Bad History Could Make Bad Policy

by Thomas H. Henriksenvia Hoover Digest
Wednesday, January 30, 2002

The dangers of learning the wrong lessons from history. By Hoover fellow Thomas H. Henriksen.

America’s New Ally?

by Michael McFaulvia Hoover Digest
Wednesday, January 30, 2002

What the United States should—and should not—do to improve relations with Vladimir Putin’s Russia. By Hoover fellow Michael McFaul.

The Invincible Tony Blair?

by Gerald A. Dorfmanvia Hoover Digest
Wednesday, January 30, 2002

Demonstrating steadfast support of the American war against terrorism, Britain’s Tony Blair has become one of the most popular politicians in the United States. Gerald A. Dorfman assesses Blair’s popularity back home.

Our Brave New World:Essays on the Impact of September 11

Our Brave New World: Essays on the Impact of September 11

by Wladyslaw Pleszczynskivia Books by Hoover Fellows
Tuesday, January 1, 2002

September 11, 2001: The beginning of a new era in American history?

Crony Capitalism and Economic Growth in Latin America: Theory and Evidence

Crony Capitalism and Economic Growth in Latin America: Theory and Evidence

by Stephen Habervia Books by Hoover Fellows
Tuesday, January 1, 2002

Crony capitalism systems—in which those close to political policymakers receive favors allowing them to earn returns far above market value—are a fundamental feature of the economies of Latin America.

Liberty and Democracy

Liberty and Democracy

by Tibor R. Machanvia Books by Hoover Fellows
Tuesday, January 1, 2002

In Liberty and Democracy, contributors grapple with the issue of the proper role of democracy in a society that is committed to respecting protecting the individual rights of all.

The Western Way of War

by Woody Westvia Policy Review
Saturday, December 1, 2001

Woody West on Carnage and Culture: Landmark Battles in the Rise of Western Power by Victor Davis Hanson

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