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WINDS OF CHANGE: Politics After Sept. 11

with Newt Gingrich, Nelson W. Polsbyvia Uncommon Knowledge
Thursday, July 18, 2002

The war on terrorism has created unique ideological challenges for both ends of the American political spectrum. Does the left, long opposed to the exercise of U.S. military power, risk irrelevance by opposing the war on terror? How does the libertarian wing of the right, long opposed to big government, respond to its expanding role in protecting our security? How has President Bush's conduct of the war on terrorism affected his chances for reelection in 2004?

Christopher Hitchens

WORDS OF WAR: What Kind of War Are We Fighting?

with Christopher Hitchens, Newt Gingrichvia Uncommon Knowledge
Thursday, July 18, 2002

What kind of war is the war on terrorism? Ordinarily wars are fought against proper nouns—against Germany during the Second World War or against the Soviet Union during the cold war, for example. Now we're being asked to fight a war against a common noun, terrorism. Just how accurate and useful is the phrase "war on terrorism"? Is this a war? And who exactly is the enemy—Al Qaeda? Al Qaeda plus all other terrorists around the world? Al Qaeda plus all other terrorists plus all the countries in which the terrorists operate? In other words, just how good a job are the president and the administration doing, not just in prosecuting the war but in defining the objectives?

Analysis and Commentary

The Case for Not Invading Iraq

by David R. Hendersonvia Hoover Daily Report
Monday, July 15, 2002

There is little evidence that Hussein is mad, and his rational response to the dangerous incentives President Bush has set up should make us afraid.

HEBREW NATIONALISTS: Why the U.S. Supports Israel

with John Podhoretz, Steven Spiegel, Stephen Zunesvia Uncommon Knowledge
Friday, June 14, 2002

Recent opinion polls that show that the American public overwhelming wants the United States to avoid taking sides in the conflict in the Middle East. Yet members of Congress have been nearly unanimous in their support of Israel in its actions against the Palestinians. Just why is our government so steadfastly supportive of Israel? Does this support further our legitimate strategic interests in the Middle East? Or is it the result of domestic special interest politics?

Analysis and Commentary

Supporting the Drug War Supports Terrorists

by David R. Hendersonvia Hoover Daily Report
Monday, May 20, 2002

Moreover, the United States government is effectively supporting left-wing terrorists in Colombia.

Analysis and Commentary

The International Criminal Court—the United States Sends Regrets

by David Davenportvia Hoover Daily Report
Monday, April 29, 2002

The establishment of a major world court without U.S. participation opens a new and troublesome chapter in international law and diplomacy.

CULTURE CLASH: A Talk with Hernando De Soto

with Hernando De Sotovia Uncommon Knowledge
Monday, April 22, 2002

In the West, capitalism reigns triumphant. Living standards, wealth, and technological development in the capitalist Western countries surpass anything seen before in human history. But why has capitalism so obviously failed in most developing countries? Why are some saying that capitalism is in a state of crisis today in the Third World? Does the success of capitalism depend on Western cultural values that simply don't translate to the Third World? Or can economic and political reforms, especially reform of property rights, enable developing countries to share the same fruits of capitalism and free enterprise that we enjoy in the West?

THE PENTAGON STRIKES BACK: The Defense Budget

with Thomas Donnelly, Cindy Williamsvia Uncommon Knowledge
Monday, April 22, 2002

In his State of the Union speech in January 2002, President Bush promised to spend "whatever it costs to defend our country." That cost, according to Bush's proposed defense budget, would come to $378 billion in 2003, $48 billion more than in 2002 and the largest percent increase in defense spending since the Reagan era. Critics are saying that the proposed 2003 budget perpetuates the Pentagon's most inefficient weapons and spending habits, thereby delaying the true transformation of the military that is needed to protect America in the twenty-first century. Who's right—the Bush administration or its critics?

Analysis and Commentary

Defense Mathematics

by Bruce Berkowitzvia Hoover Daily Report
Monday, April 22, 2002

We need to proceed aggressively on military transformation to create the flexible, agile, and rapid-response military force required to counter the asymmetric threats we now face.

TAKING LIBERTIES: Civil Liberties and National Security

with Robert Higgs, Gore Vidalvia Uncommon Knowledge
Thursday, April 18, 2002

Following the September 11 terrorist attacks, Congress passed and President Bush signed the USA Patriot Act—legislation intended to thwart the threat of domestic terrorism. Critics were quick to denounce USA Patriot as a dangerous expansion of government power at the expense of our civil liberties. Are the critics right? Or can we win the war on terrorism without sacrificing our civil liberties here at home? And what has the American experience in earlier crises, such as the Civil War and the two world wars, taught us about balancing national security and personal freedom?

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