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Wisconsin's Welfare Miracle

by Robert Rectorvia Policy Review
Saturday, March 1, 1997

How it cut its caseload in half

Profiles in Citizenship

by Matthew Spaldingvia Policy Review
Saturday, March 1, 1997

Peter Cooper, a job-training pioneer

Blessings of Liberty

by John Hoodvia Policy Review
Saturday, March 1, 1997

Adversity is the mother of invention

When an Asian Tiger Trips

by Hilton L. Rootvia Hoover Digest
Thursday, January 30, 1997

Until recently, Indonesia, with more than five times the landmass of Japan and over ten times the population of Australia, could boast both political stability and rapid economic growth. No longer. Hoover fellow Hilton L. Root explains what's gone wrong.

The Growth That Matters Most

by John B. Taylorvia Hoover Digest
Thursday, January 30, 1997

Productivity-the value of goods or services produced per hour of work-is a very important economic indicator. Hoover fellow and Stanford economics professor John B. Taylor argues that, despite the current low levels of inflation and unemployment, productivity growth in the United States has now fallen to levels not seen since before the Industrial Revolution. Why productivity growth matters-and what can be done to reverse the slump.

The Fed and the Natural Rate

by Milton Friedmanvia Hoover Digest
Thursday, January 30, 1997

Argue that the economy should be growing more briskly, and you have Nobel Prize-winner and Hoover fellow Milton Friedman's sympathy. Argue that the Federal Reserve Bank should be doing something about it, and you lose Friedman's sympathy. The man who coined the term explains why the natural rate of unemployment is no argument for loose money-or, for that matter, tight money, either.

How Much Growth Can America Expect?

by Milton Friedmanvia Hoover Digest
Thursday, January 30, 1997

President Clinton claims that the current economic growth rate of about 2.5 percent is pretty darned good. Not so fast, says Nobel Prize-winner and Hoover fellow Milton Friedman. The nation's economic history suggests that we should be doing much, much better.

Drive A Stake Through It

by Thomas Sowellvia Hoover Digest
Thursday, January 30, 1997

The passage of California's Proposition 209 has outlawed affirmative action programs in California's state government and made the status of affirmative action programs everywhere one of the most pressing issues of the day. Here Hoover fellow Thomas Sowell argues that there is precisely one way to deal with affirmative action. End it.

Seven Principles for Welfare Reform

by Martin Andersonvia Hoover Digest
Thursday, January 30, 1997

Last summer President Clinton signed into law the vast new welfare overhaul that the Republican Congress had sent him. The law abolished the federal government's welfare bulwark, Aid to Families with Dependent Children, replacing it with block grants and wide new authority for the states.

Now the states must design welfare programs that conform with the law. They could do worse than to follow the guidelines that Hoover fellow Martin Anderson set out nearly twenty years ago. Anderson's book Welfare: The Political Economy of Welfare Reform in the United States, published in 1978, represents a tour de force-a thorough analysis of the welfare system, of the proposals for changing it, and of the practical and moral arguments underlying the entire debate.

The Case Against the Case Against the Plan

by John B. Taylorvia Hoover Digest
Thursday, January 30, 1997

Hoover fellow and Stanford economics professor John B. Taylor examines the arguments against the Dole plan, one by one-and, one by one, he refutes them.

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Economic Policy Working Group

 
The Working Group on Economic Policy brings together experts on economic and financial policy to study key developments in the U.S. and global economies, examine their interactions, and develop specific policy proposals.

Milton and Rose Friedman: An Uncommon Couple