Economic Theory

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Blank Section (Placeholder)Analysis and Commentary

The Libertarian: The New Progressive Agenda

interview with Richard A. Epsteinvia The Libertarian
Thursday, February 7, 2019

Examining a raft of left-wing policy proposals from 2020 presidential candidates.

Terry Anderson in Pasadena 2019
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Terry Anderson: Renewing Indigenous Economies

interview with Terry Andersonvia Fellow Talks
Tuesday, February 5, 2019

Ideas Defining a Free Society for Indigenous People.

Blank Section (Placeholder)Analysis and Commentary

The Libertarian: Harold Demsetz And The Legacy Of The Chicago School

interview with Richard A. Epsteinvia The Libertarian
Tuesday, January 29, 2019

How a group of renegade academics reshaped our understanding of economics.

Blank Section (Placeholder)Analysis and Commentary

George Gilder: Forget Cloud Computing, Blockchain Is The Future

interview with George Gildervia Uncommon Knowledge
Monday, September 24, 2018

Author of Life After Google: The Fall of Big Data and the Rise of the Blockchain Economy, George Gilder on the future of technology.

Scott Adams
Blank Section (Placeholder)Featured

How To Fail At Almost Everything With Scott Adams

interview with Scott Adamsvia Uncommon Knowledge
Thursday, September 14, 2017

Scott Adams on Life, Business, Talent Stacks, and Trump.

Thomas Sowell discusses Intellectuals and Society on Uncommon Knowledge.

Thomas Sowell discusses his essay “‘Trickle Down Theory’ and ‘Tax Cuts for the Rich.’”

with Thomas Sowellvia Uncommon Knowledge
Monday, September 17, 2012

This week on Uncommon Knowledge, Hoover fellow and author Thomas Sowell discusses his essay “‘Trickle Down Theory’ and ‘Tax Cuts for the Rich.’” (39:52)
“Now anyone who studied history knows that for the first 150 years of this country the federal government did not intervene when the economy turned down. And all that time the downturns all corrected themselves; one of the most classic examples was under Warren G. Harding when, during his first year in office, he found the unemployment rate at 11.7 percent. He did absolutely nothing; he did not spend more government money, he cut back on spending. The Federal Reserve had the interest rates up at 6 or 7 percent, not down at 1 percent, where they are now. The next year unemployment was at 6.7 percent; the year after that it was 2.4 percent. So the economy has recuperative powers. I mean employers have an incentive to hire people. Workers have an incentive to get jobs. Lenders have incentives to lend.”

George W. Bush

George W. Bush

with George W. Bushvia Uncommon Knowledge
Wednesday, July 18, 2012

This week on Uncommon Knowledge President George W. Bush discusses postpresidential life and his work at the Bush Institute. (1:03:21)
“I believe we are a blessed nation; that is, therefore, we have a sense of responsibility to the extent we can to help others. In this case there was a pandemic destroying an entire generation of people. And I didn’t see how I could be president of a powerful, the most powerful, and the richest nation and not lend our support to saving lives. It would have been unconscionable not to act. So I thought it was in our moral interest to act. I also knew it was in our national security interest to act.”

EnvironmentFeatured

A Market For Water Would Solve Many Of California’s Water Woes

by Lee Ohanianvia California on Your Mind
Tuesday, January 22, 2019

Last week’s column described how California has not provided reliable and reasonably priced water supplies to Californians. It also described how failure to maintain existing water infrastructure and invest in new water infrastructure has played an important role in California’s chronic water shortages. 

In the News

Do Economic Booms Die Of Old Age?

quoting Robert E. Hallvia Bloomberg
Thursday, January 10, 2019

Ben Bernanke got a big laugh from economists in Atlanta on Jan. 4. A few minutes after Janet Yellen said, “I don’t think expansions just die of old age,” he replied, “I like to say they get murdered.” All right, not that funny. But the nerdy repartee between the past two Federal Reserve chairs at the annual meeting of the American Economic Association reveals how central bankers think about recessions—and says something about how likely it is that the U.S. will tip into one over the next year.

Workshop Series on the 2008 Financial Crisis: Causes, The Panic, The Recession, Lessons

Friday, December 7, 2018
Annenberg Conference Room, Lou Henry Hoover Building

Market and policy antecedents and repercussions of the 2008 Financial Crisis and the Great Recession began long before and lasted long after the Lehman bankruptcy in September 2018. 

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Economic Policy Working Group

 
The Working Group on Economic Policy brings together experts on economic and financial policy to study key developments in the U.S. and global economies, examine their interactions, and develop specific policy proposals.

Milton and Rose Friedman: An Uncommon Couple