Filter By:

Subtopic

Type

Fellow

Research Team

Use comma-separated ID numbers for each author

Support the Hoover Institution

Join the Hoover Institution's community of supporters in advancing ideas defining a free society.

Support Hoover

In the News

Dishonesty Now Biggest Threat To Democracy

quoting William Damonvia Newsday
Friday, June 7, 2019

Two inter-related issues — highlighted in two feedbacks I have received over the past six months — should be addressed as a matter of priority and urgency. The first one is do with what one mobile money transfer platform has given rise to or morphed into — a replica or clone of the Old Mutual-implied interbank rate.

Analysis and Commentary

Americans Are Real Victims Of Our Trade War With Mexico And China

by Markos Kounalakisvia Miami Herald
Friday, June 7, 2019

America has declared war on China and Mexico, but it is a new style of warfare. Or at least it seems so. With the latest volley of levied and threatened tariffs on Chinese and Mexican exports, POTUS has thrust the U.S. into a new phase of economic warfare against both competitors and friends.

In the News

Trump Blames Mexico For A Problem With No Borders

quoting George P. Shultzvia The Washington Post
Friday, June 7, 2019

The United States and Mexico are squaring off in a tense showdown entirely of President Trump’s making. Following a tweeted announcement from the president, the Trump administration is readying a 5 percent tariff on $350 billion worth of Mexican goods imported into the United States. Trump threatened the punitive measure as a result of Mexico’s supposed inability to thwart flows of migrants making their way north. U.S. and Mexican officials met in Washington this week to hash out a deal that would dispel the possibility of a new trade war. At the time of writing, there was cautious optimism that the impasse could be breached.

Analysis and Commentary

Futures Forecasts

by John H. Cochrane via Grumpy Economist
Friday, June 7, 2019
Torsten Slok at DB updates this lovely graph on occasion. Here's what it means. Fed fund futures are essentially bets on where the Federal funds rate will be at various points in the future. Thus, you can read from the dashed lines the market's guess about where the federal funds rate will go -- assuming that the bets are priced to have an even chance of winning or losing.
Featured

Institutionalized Nonsense

by John H. Cochrane via Grumpy Economist
Thursday, June 6, 2019

When, last week, the Treasury issued its currency manipulation report, I thought it was a joke. Treasury put Germany and Italy on its "monitoring list" of countries suspected of "currency manipulation."

In the News

Banks Can’t Cut Rates Till Govt Drops EPF, Etc, Interest

quoting Raghuram Rajanvia Financial Express
Thursday, June 6, 2019

The sharp deceleration in growth over the past year, culminating in a jaw-dropping 5.8% year-on-year (y-o-y) in the March quarter, is enough evidence the economy is stalling. Although there is a clamour for a policy rate cut, high interest rates are not the main cause for poor growth though there is doubt that a smaller interest bill does make a big difference to small businesses.

Interviews

Lanhee Chen: Watch An Expert Explain The Implications Of Trump’s Trade Tactics

interview with Lanhee J. Chenvia CNBC
Thursday, June 6, 2019

Hoover Institution fellow Lanhee Chen talks about the President Trump's trade negotiation tactics with China and Mexico.

Edward Lazear
Featured

Santelli Exchange: Former CEA Chairman Ed Lazear

interview with Edward Paul Lazearvia CNBC
Thursday, June 6, 2019

Hoover Institution fellow Ed Lazear discusses wages, the jobs report, the fed, trade, tariffs, and much more.

The Historical Performance of the Federal Reserve

by Michael D. Bordovia Books by Hoover Fellows
Thursday, June 6, 2019

Distinguished economist Michael D. Bordo argues for the importance of monetary stability and monetary rules, offering theoretical, empirical, and historical perspectives to support his case. He shows how the pursuit of stable monetary policy guided by central banks following rule-like behavior produces low and stable inflation, stable real performance, and encourages financial stability. In contrast, he explains how the failure to adhere to rules that produce monetary stability will inevitably produce the dire consequences of real, nominal, and financial instability.

In the News

Monetary Policy Stability, Rules Critical For Economy

Thursday, June 6, 2019
Hoover Institution, Stanford University

Economist Michael D. Bordo argues in a new Hoover Institution Press book for the importance of monetary stability and monetary rules, offering theoretical, empirical, and historical perspectives to support his case.

News

Pages

Economic Policy Working Group

 
The Working Group on Economic Policy brings together experts on economic and financial policy to study key developments in the U.S. and global economies, examine their interactions, and develop specific policy proposals.

Milton and Rose Friedman: An Uncommon Couple