Regions

Defense
interview with Michael McFaulvia PBS
Athens, Greece
by Josef Joffevia New York Times
interview with Michael McFaulvia NPR
interview with Michael Spencevia Bloomberg Television
Barack Obama
interview with Richard A. Epsteinvia John Batchelor Show
Chess pieces
by Victor Davis Hansonvia Corner (National Review Online)

Filter By:

Type

Fellow

Research Team

Use comma-separated ID numbers for each author

Support the Hoover Institution

Join the Hoover Institution's community of supporters in advancing ideas defining a free society.

Support Hoover

War Plane
Analysis and Commentary

War Was Interested In Obama

by Victor Davis Hansonvia Works and Days
Sunday, June 15, 2014

Leon Trotsky probably did not quite write the legendary aphorism that “you may not be interested in war, but war is interested in you.” But whoever did, you get the point that no nation can always pick and choose when it wishes to be left alone.

Middle East turmoil
Analysis and Commentary

The Men Who Sealed Iraq's Disaster With a Handshake

by Fouad Ajamivia Wall Street Journal
Friday, June 13, 2014

Two men bear direct responsibility for the mayhem engulfing Iraq: Barack Obama and Nouri al-Maliki.

this is an image
Interviews

Lanhee Chen on Political Capitol with Al Hunt (19:15)

interview with Lanhee J. Chenvia Bloomberg Television
Friday, June 13, 2014

On this week’s “Political Capital, Tom Davis, former Virginia congressman, on what effect Eric Cantor's demise has on the 2014 and 2016 elections, John Negroponte, former ambassador to Iraq, on what to do about the unrest there, Julianna Goldman on Obama's slipping poll numbers, and Lanhee Chen and Margaret Carlson debate who is to blame for Iraq.

an image
Interviews

Tunku Varadarajan on the John Batchelor Show (32:32)

interview with Tunku Varadarajanvia John Batchelor Show
Friday, June 13, 2014

Tunku Varadarajan discusses the crisis in Iraq on the John Batchelor Show.

Pressure on Ukraine image
Analysis and Commentary

Crimea after Cyprus v. Turkey: Just Satisfaction for Unlawful Annexation?

by Thomas D. Grantvia European Journal of International Law
Monday, May 19, 2014

On 13 March 2014 Ukraine lodged an inter-state application under Article 33 of the European Convention against the Russian Federation. Philip Leach has addressed in this forum the likely implications, suggesting that the occupation of Crimea will present a situation for the European Court similar to that in Ilaşcu v. Moldova and Russia.

In Retreat: America's Withdrawal from the Middle East

In Retreat: America’s Withdrawal from the Middle East

by Russell A. Bermanvia Fellow Talks
Monday, May 5, 2014

Russell Berman, a senior fellow at the Hoover Institution, discussed US foreign policy in the Middle East in his talk entitled “In Retreat: America’s Withdrawal from the Middle East.” 

Poster Collection, RU/SU 2165, Hoover Institution Archives.
Background Essay

Ukraine Adrift Between East and West

by Kori Schakevia Strategika
Tuesday, April 1, 2014

The current issue of Strategika asks the question: Are 20th-century-style conventional military assets and strategies still relevant, or are they being replaced by drones, cyber-warfare, counterinsurgency, and satellite technologies?  Using history as a guide, Andrew Roberts, Frederick W. Kagan, and Peter R. Mansoor all argue for the continuing relevance of conventional weapons and soldiers, even though the there is an inherent unpredictability to the exact nature of future conflicts.
 

The Provinces

China’s Top Future Leaders to Watch: Biographical Sketches of Possible Members of the Post-2012 Politburo (Part 3)

by Cheng Livia China Leadership Monitor
Monday, October 1, 2012

The composition of the new Politburo, including generational attributes and individual idiosyncratic characteristics, group dynamics, and the factional balance of power, will have profound implications for China’s economic priorities, social stability, political trajectory, and foreign relations. This third entry in a four-part series provides concise profiles of possible members of the next Politburo, focusing on the following three aspects: personal and professional background, family and patron-client ties, and political prospects and policy preferences.

The Provinces

China’s Top Future Leaders to Watch: Biographical Sketches of Possible Members of the post-2012 Politburo (Part 2)

by Cheng Livia China Leadership Monitor
Monday, August 6, 2012

The composition of the new Politburo, including generational attributes and individual idiosyncratic characteristics, group dynamics, and the factional balance of power, will have profound implications for China’s economic priorities, social stability, political trajectory, and foreign relations. To a great extent, these leaders’ political position and policy preferences are often shaped or constrained by their personal experience, leadership expertise, factional affiliation, and bureaucratic portfolio. This series will provide concise and primarily fact-based biographies for 25 to 30 possible members of the next Politburo, focusing on the following three aspects: personal and professional background, family and patron-client ties, and political prospects and policy preferences. The aim is to present a complete set of biographical sketches of all members of this supreme leadership body by the time the 18th Party Congress has wrapped up in the fall of 2012.

Foreign Policy

Chinese Leadership and Elite Responses to the U.S. Pacific Pivot

by Michael D. Swainevia China Leadership Monitor
Monday, August 6, 2012

Over the past several years, the most significant overall U.S. foreign policy action of relevance to China has been the announcement and initial follow-through of the so-called Pacific pivot or “Rebalancing” of U.S. attention and resources to the Asia-Pacific. Many observers and officials in the United States, China, Asia, and elsewhere view this policy move as an important response not only to the growing overall significance of the region to American interests, but in particular to the challenges and opportunities presented by an increasingly powerful China. The Pacific Pivot has thus drawn considerable attention and levels of controversy in many quarters, and nowhere more so than in Beijing. This article takes a close look at Beijing’s reactions to Washington’s increased stress on Asia, including its assessments of the perceived implications of this policy shift for the region and for China in particular.

Pages

Research Teams