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We the People

by Adam Meyersonvia Policy Review
Monday, September 1, 1997

Adam Meyerson on the Breakfast for Champions

Home Front

by Kristine Napiervia Policy Review
Monday, September 1, 1997

Kristine Napier examines private low-income health-care alternatives for children

Town Square

via Policy Review
Monday, September 1, 1997

News from the Citizenship Movement

Laboratories of Democracy

by Bernadette Malonevia Policy Review
Monday, September 1, 1997

Conservative hopes for upcoming governors’ races in New Jersey and Virginia

The Get Real Congress

by Tod Lindbergvia Policy Review
Monday, September 1, 1997

Conservative disappointments are more than just a failure of nerve

The Costs of Getting Tough

by Joseph D. McNamaravia Hoover Digest
Wednesday, July 30, 1997

In November 1994, California voters passed Proposition 184, the "three strikes" ballot initiative. The initiative required criminals to receive life sentences for third felony convictions. How has the law been working? According to Hoover fellow and former San Jose chief of police Joseph D. McNamara, not well at all.

Campaign Finance: Roll Back the Reforms

by David Brady, Nelson W. Polsby, Peter M. Robinsonvia Hoover Digest
Wednesday, July 30, 1997

Hoover fellow David Brady and Berkeley political scientist Nelson W. Polsby believe we need fewer limits on political contributions, not more. An interview by Hoover fellow Peter Robinson.

Speak Softly and Carry a Big Umbrella

by Arnold Beichmanvia Hoover Digest
Wednesday, July 30, 1997

When Hoover fellow Arnold Beichman listens to President Clinton on China, what he hears is Neville Chamberlain. Appeasement, anyone?

Books

The New Federalism: Can the States Be Trusted?

via Hoover Institution Press
Tuesday, July 29, 1997

The New Federalism investigates whether returning a variety of regulatory and police powers back to the states will yield better government. It poses the provocative question, Can the states be trusted? and emerges with a qualified yes. This book should be an invaluable resource to federal and state policymakers alike.

Editorial

by Adam Meyersonvia Policy Review
Tuesday, July 1, 1997

Adam Meyerson on conservatism's leadership crisis

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Research Teams