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Wisconsin's Welfare Miracle

by Robert Rectorvia Policy Review
Saturday, March 1, 1997

How it cut its caseload in half

I Hear America Singing

by William Craig Ricevia Policy Review
Saturday, March 1, 1997

The arts will flower without the NEA

One Nation Under God

by Ron Rosenbergervia Policy Review
Saturday, March 1, 1997

Spiritual capital for the capital city

Town Square

via Policy Review
Saturday, March 1, 1997

News from the Citizenship Movement

The Case Against the Case Against the Plan

by John B. Taylorvia Hoover Digest
Thursday, January 30, 1997

Hoover fellow and Stanford economics professor John B. Taylor examines the arguments against the Dole plan, one by one-and, one by one, he refutes them.

How the Budget Would Have Balanced

by John F. Coganvia Hoover Digest
Thursday, January 30, 1997

Hoover fellow John F. Cogan does the arithmetic.

These Are the Facts, Folks

by Michael J. Boskinvia Hoover Digest
Thursday, January 30, 1997

Wouldn't the Dole plan have been Reaganomics all over again? Voodoo Two? Hoover fellow and Stanford economics professor Michael J. Boskin points out that Reagan's tax cut wasn't voodoo in the first place-and that Dole's plan wasn't black magic either.

How the Plan was Born

by Bruce Bartlettvia Hoover Digest
Thursday, January 30, 1997

Columnist and Hoover media fellow Bruce Bartlett calculated that a 15 percent tax-rate cut would be just enough to roll back President Clinton's tax increases. Bartlett mentioned his idea to a senator named Spencer Abraham, who mentioned it to a senator named Bob Dole.

Drive A Stake Through It

by Thomas Sowellvia Hoover Digest
Thursday, January 30, 1997

The passage of California's Proposition 209 has outlawed affirmative action programs in California's state government and made the status of affirmative action programs everywhere one of the most pressing issues of the day. Here Hoover fellow Thomas Sowell argues that there is precisely one way to deal with affirmative action. End it.

Seven Principles for Welfare Reform

by Martin Andersonvia Hoover Digest
Thursday, January 30, 1997

Last summer President Clinton signed into law the vast new welfare overhaul that the Republican Congress had sent him. The law abolished the federal government's welfare bulwark, Aid to Families with Dependent Children, replacing it with block grants and wide new authority for the states.

Now the states must design welfare programs that conform with the law. They could do worse than to follow the guidelines that Hoover fellow Martin Anderson set out nearly twenty years ago. Anderson's book Welfare: The Political Economy of Welfare Reform in the United States, published in 1978, represents a tour de force-a thorough analysis of the welfare system, of the proposals for changing it, and of the practical and moral arguments underlying the entire debate.

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